B.S. in Middle Grades Education Courses

COURSES STUDENT TEACHING FAQS OVERVIEW KSU CATALOG

IMPORTANT: Those admitted to the BS in Middle Grades Education program before Fall Semester 2015 will take the courses in the program outlined below. Those admitted to the BS in Middle Grades Education program after Fall Semester 2015 will take courses in the program outline that follows the one below.

For those admitted to the BS in Middle Grades Education program before Fall Semester 2015:

General Education (42 Credit Hours)

See Listing of General Education Requirements

Lower Division Major Requirements (Area F) (18 Credit Hours)

  • This course engages potential education candidates in observations and interactions in schools, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Candidates investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Candidates actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, candidates reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture. Includes the use of current technologies which are directly related to effective teaching and 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

    Notes: Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

    Offered as an online course.

  • This course introduces teachers to fundamental knowledge of culture essential for effective teaching in increasingly diverse classrooms. Designed as a foundation course for subsequent courses focused on the preparation of culturally responsive teachers, this course examines 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definition and implications of diversity. Includes 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting-elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • This course explores key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. Includes 10 hours of observation and interaction with a learner in a naturalistic setting. Current use of technology will be integrated as communication and instructional tools. Verification of professional liability insurance is required.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.

Mathematics

  • A first course in calculus and analytic geometry. Topics include fundamental concepts of limits, continuity, derivatives, and integrals of functions of one variable. Incorporates applications from a variety of disciplines. Modern computing technology will be used where necessary and appropriate.

  • Introduction to Mathematical Systems is a course specifically designed to introduce students to the study of mathematics from a mathematical systems approach. A mathematical system consisting of undefined terms, axioms and theorems will be studied. The major emphasis of this class will be on the development of skills in communicating and justifying mathematical ideas and conclusions. Mathematical systems studied will vary according to the instructor and may be chosen from sets, number systems and/or geometry.

  • This course develops geometry as an axiomatic mathematical system and approaches it from synthetic, transformational, and algebraic perspectives, including higher dimensions. Various geometries are studied including finite, infinite, projective, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean. Includes a research project on a topic which would be appropriate for any entry-level school geometry student.

  • Students’ understanding of the mathematics taught in middle school and the first few years of high school will be deepened and broadened through the study of key topics including algebra, linear functions, exponential functions, quadratic functions, number theory, discrete mathematics, and mathematical modeling. This course is designed so that students can revisit key ideas in school mathematics, bringing with them the skills and understandings of college course work in mathematics, deepening and broadening their understanding, and connecting more advanced ideas to the topics they will teach in middle school and high school.

  • Designed for the preservice teacher of mathematics for adolescents. Content strands to be explored include number and operation, algebra, and measurement. The process standards of communication, connections, problem solving, reasoning and proof, and representation will be emphasized. Appropriate use of manipulatives, calculators and software will be integrated in course materials.

Take all required courses (16 Credit Hours) if math is Teaching Field B. Take all required courses plus one approved math elective (19 Credit Hours) if math is Teaching Field A.

Science

Take all required courses (18 Credit Hours). Science can be Teaching Field A only.

  • This course provides a survey of the general principles of atomic structure, bonding, reaction, solutions, equilibria as required for a basic understanding of physiological applications. A brief introduction to organic compounds that are of particular importance in pharmacological applications is given.

  • Laboratory course to study and apply topics and concepts covered in CHEM 1151.

  • This course introduces students to molecular and cellular concepts in biology. Topics covered include biochemistry, cell structure and function, enzymology, metabolism and molecular and population genetics. In the laboratory, students will use techniques such as spectrophotometry, microscopy, centrifugation, and other separation techniques to study the molecular components and function of cells.

    Notes: For science majors.

  • This lab complements BIOL 1107. Students will learn how to use scientific equipment to explore the cell and molecular biology in plant and animals as well as the biochemistry of life. Students will learn about experimental design and how to generate and interpret scientific data.

  • An introduction to basic earth science concepts and methodology (including geology, meteorology, and oceanography) will be covered. Special emphasis will be placed on dynamic Earth processes (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanism, climate, etc.) and their effects on the structure and composition of the landforms, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. The lab component includes hands-on evaluation of a collection of Igneous, Metamorphic and Sedimentary rocks, topographic map analyses, spectral imaging and remote sensing, and modeling weather related phenomena.

  • This course focuses on fundamental physics concepts, including mechanics, optics, electricity and magnetism, and how we can use them to explain “how and why” everyday systems work. Students will build devices and conduct hands-on laboratory activities that illustrate these concepts and demonstrate how we can use these concepts to explain the operation of common technologies.

    Notes: Students with credit in PHYS 1111/1112 or PHYS 2211/2212 may not take this course without permission of the instructor.

  • An introduction to Solar System Astronomy. Topics include planetary motion and its role in the scientific revolution, theories for the origin of the solar system, the history and evolution of the Earth, comparative planetology and the origin of life. This course will emphasize physical principles and conceptual understanding.

  • An introduction to stellar Astronomy and Cosmology. Topics include stellar structure and evolution, end states of stars such as white dwarfs and black holes, active galaxies and quasars, the large-scale structure of the universe, and theories for the origin and evolution of the Universe. This course will emphasize physical principles and conceptual understanding.

Social Studies

(15-18 Credit Hours) - Take all required courses plus two approved social studies electives (15 Credit Hours) if social studies is Teaching Field B. Take all required courses plus three approved social studies electives (18 Credit Hours) if social studies is Teaching Field A.

  • An introduction to world regions through the context of human geography. The course focuses on basic geographic concepts to analyze social, economic and political issues at local, regional and global scales. Elements of fundamental physical geography will be discussed to illustrate the spatial relationships between the physical environment and human geography.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.

  • Explores major themes in the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the peoples of North America to 1890. Topics include the intersection of cultures in colonial America, the origin and development of the American republic, the evolution of democratic ideas and institutions, western expansion, slavery, sectional conflict, emancipation and its aftermath, immigration, social and cultural change, the Industrial Revolution, and the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs. Examination of primary sources forms an important element of this course.

  • A consideration of Georgia’s political, economic, social, and cultural development from the colonial period to the present. Topics include the cultures of indigenous peoples, the Spanish in Georgia, the founding of a British colony, the Revolution, Indian removal, antebellum society, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the New South era, the rise and decline of the cotton economy, race relations, and post-World War II prosperity and problems.

Language Arts

Take all required courses (15 Credit Hours) if language arts is Teaching Field B. Take all required courses plus one approved language arts elective (18 Credit Hours) if language arts is Teaching Field A.

  • Professional and community standards demand that English teachers model effective language arts skills and applications. In this course, students will prepare for that role. They will study, practice, and apply the effective language strategies and skills needed to guide today’s English/Language Arts classrooms.

  • This course will analyze the nature of human language. It will include an introduction to speech sounds, morphology, syntax, and semantics. A heavy emphasis will be placed on the social and pedagogical implications of modern linguistic theory which will include an examination of issues such as language acquisition, dialect variation, historical linguistics and English as a Second Language.

  • An exploration of current theories of grammar instruction and theories of composition pedagogy and assessment, including a variety of strategies for teaching writing while dealing with institutional policies such as standardized testing. Students will also acquire competence in oral and written communication, understand what grammar errors reveal about writing, learn about syntactic complexity in writing, and study grammatical structures that promote syntactic growth and diversity of style in writing. In a writing workshop environment, students will write for a variety of purposes and audiences.

  • A survey of classic literature written by diverse authors. The texts studied are frequently found in middle grades classroom. Focus will be on text analysis and writing about literature.

Reading

Reading is not an option for Teaching Field A. For Teaching Field B, take all required courses plus one approved reading elective (15 Credit Hours).

  • A study of the socio-psycholinguistic foundations of reading and writing for teachers of adolescents. This course examines language development, reading acquisition, phonemic awareness, word identification, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension and motivation. It explores historical perspectives of reading, reading research and theory, and introduces students to a wide range of instructional practices and curriculum materials that meet the needs of all adolescent learners.

  • This course is designed to develop appropriate research-based teaching strategies that will enable candidates teaching or mentoring in a middle grades classroom to effectively integrate reading and wiritng instruction. Candidates will apply learning theories, teaching techniques, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for middle grades learners that apply to both reading and writing instruction. Students will develop and implement plans for teaching writing through content area reading texts that promote critical thinking and cross-curricular engagement.

  • This course provides an understanding for selecting and using diverse young adult literature in middle grades classrooms. It examines reading and writing theories and introduces students to various methodologies for teaching literature. It acquaints students with a reading and writing experience using diverse literary works for adolescents, introduces students to book selection aids and electronic database media resources for middle grades environments.

  • An introduction to a wide range of reading assessment instruments including reading inventories, miscue analysis, and pausing indices used for understanding the individual and diverse needs of adolescents. Teacher candidates in this course will examine both informal and formal assessments including technology-based assessment. Candidates will use assessment data to plan, evaluate, and revise effective reading instruction that meets the diverse needs of students. A field component is included.

Professional Education Requirements (36 credit hours)

  • A study of methods and materials for reading and writing to learn in the middle grades. Emphasis will be placed on making meaning from a variety of text sources including young adult literature, technical, informational, environmental, and media. Instructional strategies for reading and writing in content areas will be showcased. This course acquaints candidates with a reading and writing experience using diverse works for adolescents, introduces students to text selection and electronic database media resources for middle grades classrooms. A focus on language and cultural diversity is included.

  • This course is designed to provide the future middle grades teacher with the knowledge and skills necessary to design and evaluate effective curriculum, instruction, and assessment for a diverse population of middle grades learners. Topics include backwards design, best practices in curriculum and assessment, differentiation strategies, standards-based instruction, and analysis of test results in the middle grades classroom.

  • This course is an intensive and extensive field experience in an elementary school. Candidates will be required to spend seven and one half hours per day, five days a week, for four weeks. Candidates must have a satisfactory field experience to continue on to student teaching. Proof of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • The focus of this course is on preparing prospective middle grade teacher candidates to create and manage positive, productive classroom environments, including those in urban settings. It is understood that these classrooms typically include diverse groups of learners. Management is accomplished through both the development of a comprehensive understanding of the learning and behavior principles that underlie effective classroom management and acquisition of the strategies and skills needed to implement an effective management program.

  • Full-time teaching experience under the supervision of a public school cooperating teacher and college supervisor in an upper elementary school classroom or in a middle school. Includes regularly scheduled professional seminars. Proof of liability insurance is required prior to school placement.

    Notes: Proof of professional liability insurance is required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • Prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of disabilities, in a diverse society. The course focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practice in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. This course requires an observational experience in an assigned school placement. Verification of professional liability insurance is required prior to placement in the field experience. Fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement.

    Notes: Offered as an online course.

*EDMG 4406 is blocked with two 3-hour courses corresponding to your selected areas of Teaching Field Concentration:

  • This course is a segment of a 12-hour block designed to develop appropriate teaching strategies in mathematics. Students apply learning theories, teaching techniques, questioning strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for middle grades learners. Candidates will develop and implement plans for teaching mathematics in an interdisciplinary team setting.

  • This course is a segment of a 12-hour block designed to develop appropriate teaching strategies in science. Students apply learning theories, teaching techniques, questioning strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for middle grades learners. Candidates will develop and implement plans for teaching science in an interdisciplinary team setting.

  • This course is a segment of a 12-hour block designed to develop appropriate teaching strategies in social studies. Students apply learning theories, teaching techniques, questioning strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for middle grades learners. Candidates will develop and implement plans for teaching social studies in an interdisciplinary team setting.

  • This course is a segment of a 12-hour block designed to develop appropriate teaching strategies in language arts. Students apply learning theories, teaching techniques, questioning strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for middle grades learners. Candidates will develop and implement plans for teaching language arts in an interdisciplinary team setting.

  • This course is a segment of a 12-hour block designed to develop appropriate teaching strategies in reading. Students apply learning theories, teaching techniques, questioning strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for middle grades learners. Students will develop and implement plans for teaching reading in an interdisciplinary team setting. In an extensive field experience, students will teach middle grades learners.

    Notes: Proof of professional liability insurance is required prior to receiving a school placement.

For those admitted in Fall 2015 and After

General Education (43 hours)

Specific General Education Requirements for Major:
Students whose content concentration area is Math or Science should take MATH 1112, College Trigonometry or MATH 1113, Pre-Calculus as part of their General Education requirement. All middle grades majors should take MATH 1107 Statistics.

All students should take:

  • ANTH 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Anthropology or PSYC 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Psychology or SOCI 2105 - Social Issues: Perspectives in Sociology
  • SCI 1101 - Science, Society, and the Environment I
  • SCI 1102 - Science, Society and the Environment II
  • Fitness for Living requirement (3 hours)

Lower Division Major Requirements (Area F)

  • EDUC 2110 - Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education*
  • EDUC 2120 - Sociocultural Influences on Teaching and Learning*

*MGE majors should take sections of EDUC 2110 and EDUC 2120 that are designated as MGE/SEC/P-12-focused sections in Owl Express.  Take both classes during the same semester.

  • EDUC 2130 - Exploring Teaching and Learning

Students must also complete at least three hours of study in one of their chosen teaching fields and six hours of study in their other teaching field as a part of Area F.  Please see required courses under Teaching Field Requirements)

Teaching Field Requirements

Candidates must complete a total of at least 18 hours of coursework in a primary teaching field and at least 15 hours of coursework in a secondary teaching field chosen from the following five teaching field concentrations. For each content area, 9 hours of study must be at the 3000-level or above. Those majoring in science must take 18 hours of science courses due to labs.

1. Mathematics (16 Credit Hours)

Candidates should take MATH 1112 - College Trigonometry or MATH 1113 - Precalculus and MATH 1107 - Statistics as part of their General Education requirements.

  • MATH 1190 - Calculus I (4 hours)
  • MATH 3295 - Mathematics for Middle Grades and Secondary Teachers
  • MATH 3390 - Introduction to Mathematical Systems
  • MATH 3395 - Geometry
  • MATH 3495 - Advanced Perspectives on School Mathematics Part I
    Elective: Take MAED 3475 - Historical and Modern Approaches to Mathematics for three more hours if math is your primary teaching field.

2. Science (18 Credit Hours)

Candidates should take MATH 1112 - College Trigonometry or MATH 1113 - Precalculus and MATH 1107 - Statistics as part of their General Education requirements. All science classes listed below are required.

  • CHEM 1151 - Survey of Chemistry I
  • CHEM 1151L - Survey of Chemistry I Laboratory
  • BIOL 1107 - Biological Principles I
  • BIOL 1107L – Biological Principles I Laboratory
  • SCI 3360 - Earth Science
  • PHYS 3310 - How and Why - The Physics in Everyday Life
  • ASTR 3321 - Solar System Astronomy or ASTR 3320 - Astronomy and Cosmology

3. Social Studies (9 Credit Hours)

  • GEOG 1101 - World Regional Geography
  • HIST 2111 - America to 1890
  • HIST 3304 - History of Georgia

Select TWO from the following if social studies is your secondary teaching field or THREE if it is your primary teaching field.  At least two of these courses must be at the 3000 level or above. (6-9 Credit Hours):

  • HIST 2206 - Origins of Great Traditions
  • HIST 3305 - The World Since 1945
  • HIST 3366 - History of Mexico and Central America
  • HIST 3367 - History of Brazil
  • HIST 3373 - Modern India and South Asia
  • HIST 3374 - Modern China and Japan
  • HIST 3382 - North Africa and the Middle East in Modern Times
  • HIST 3391 - History of West Africa
  • HIST 3392 - History of Southern, Eastern and Central Africa
  • HIST 3393 - Emerging Themes in African History
  • GEOG 3312 - Geography of Europe
  • GEOG 3340 - Cultural Geography
  • GEOG 3350 - Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa
  • GEOG 3360 - Geography of Asia
  • GEOG 3370 - Geography of Latin America and the Caribbean
  • GEOG 3380 - Geography of North America

4. Language Arts (15 Credit Hours)

  • ENGL 2271 - Presentation in the English/Language Arts Classroom
  • ENGL 3035 - Introduction to Language and Linguistics
  • ENGL 3310 - Principles of Writing Instruction (6 hours)
  • ENGL 3390 - Great Works for Middle Grades Teachers

Electives: (Choose one for 3 more hours if Language Arts is your primary content area)

  • ENGL 2160 - American Literature Survey
  • ENGL 2172 - British Literature, Beginnings to 1660
  • ENGL 2174 - British Literature, 1660 to Present
  • ENGL 3330 - Gender Studies
  • ENGL 3340 - Ethnic Literatures
  • ENGL 3350 - Regional Literature
  • ENGL 3360 - Major African American Writers
  • ENGL 3400 - Survey of African Literatures
  • ENGL 3500 - Topics in African American Literature
  • EDRD 4409 - Young Adult Literature: Cross-Curricular Approaches for Diverse Learners

5. Reading (15 hours) –

Note: Reading can be selected only as the secondary content area.

  • EDRD 3320 - Understanding the Reader and the Reading Process
  • EDRD 3350 - Integrated Reading/Writing Instruction in the Middle Grades
  • EDRD 4409 - Young Adult Literature: Cross-Curricular Approaches for Diverse Learners
  • EDRD 4411 - Reading Diagnostics for Teachers of Adolescents

Electives: Choose one of the following courses

  • EDRD 3360 - Introduction to New Literacies
  • INED 4430 - Applied Linguistics and English Language Literacy

Professional Education (Certification for grades 4-8) Requirements

Must be admitted to Teacher Education before taking these courses!

  • EDMG 3300 - Success in the Middle: Adolescent Development and Middle School Advocacy*
  • EDRD 3330 - Methods and Materials for Middle Grades Content Area Reading and Writing*

*Middle grades education majors should take EDMG 3300 and EDRD 3330 during the same semester.

  • EDMG 3350 - Planning, Instruction, and Assessment *
  • ITEC 3200 – Improving Learning with Technology in Middle Grades Classrooms*
  • EDMG 3360 - Classroom Management in the Middle Grades*

*Middle grades education majors should take EDMG 3350, ITEC 3200, and EDMG 3360 during the same semester.

  • EDMG 4650 – Yearlong Clinical Experiences I
  • INED 3305 - Education of Students with Exceptionalities in an Inclusive Setting 1*
  • INED 4435 – Foundations of Teaching Adolescent English Learners**

*Middle grades education majors should take EDMG 3350, ITEC 3200, and EDMG 3360 during the same semester.

**Middle grades majors should take the two courses from the list below that correspond with their content area concentrations during the same semester as EDMG 4650. 

  • EDMG 4401 - Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades
  • EDMG 4402 - Teaching Science in Middle Grades
  • EDMG 4403 - Teaching Social Studies in Middle Grades
  • EDMG 4404 - Teaching Language Arts in Middle Grades
  • EDMG 4408 - Teaching Reading in the Middle Grades
  • EDMG 4660 – Yearlong Clinical Experience II**
  • EDMG 4411 – Seminar in Middle Grades Education
  • INED 4436 – Teaching Diverse Language Learners in the Content Areas
  • INED 3306 – Education of Students with Exceptionalities in an Inclusive Setting 2

*Middle grades education majors should take EDMG 4660, EDMG 4411, INED 3306, and INED 4436 during the same semester.


 

 

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