B.S. in Secondary Education Requirements

REQUIREMENTS FAQS OVERVIEW KSU CATALOG

Program of Study: General Education Courses

Program Total: 120-124 Credit Hours

The program includes 120-124 total hours (depending on concentration), including, at least, 33 hours of professional sequence courses. All students complete 60 total hours of General Education courses. The number of hours required for upper division courses vary depending on concentration:

  • Mathematics Education - 27 credit hours
  • Chemistry Education - 28 credit hours
  • Physics Education - 30 credit hours
  • Broad Field Education (Biology Emphasis) - 31 credit hours

Area A: Communication & Quantitative (10 credit hours)

  • Focuses on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation. Also includes introductory use of a variety of research skills.

  • Focuses on developing writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by ENGL 1101. Emphasizes interpretation and evaluation and advanced research methods.

  • MATH 1112: College Trigonometry
    This course is an in-depth study of the properties of trigonometric functions and their inverses. Emphasis is placed on the unit circle approach to the study of trigonometric functions and their graphs. Topics include circular functions, special angles, solutions of triangles, trigonometric identities and equations, graphs of trigonometric functions, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs, Law of Sines, Law of Cosines, and vectors.

    MATH 1113: Precalculus
    This course is an intensive study of the basic functions needed for the study of calculus. Topics include algebraic, functional, and graphical techniques for solving problems with algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their inverses.

  • This course is the first in the calculus curriculum and introduces the central concepts of calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable, applications of these concepts and a brief introduction to the integral of a function.

Area B: Institutional Option - Critical Thinking (5 credit hours)

  • This course is an overview of the communication discipline that identifies and explores the various components, situations, and channels involved in the communication process. The main objective is for students to critically assess and improve their personal and professional communication skills with others.

  • This course provides students with the knowledge and tools necessary to critically examine social and policy issues from an economic perspective. Fundamental economic questions as they relate to individuals, firms, and society in the modern global world are addressed. Students learn about different economic systems, how markets function, the role of government in the economy, the basis for international trade, measurement of macroeconomic performance, and the impact of globalization on living standards and economic growth.

Area C: Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics (6 credit hours)

Select one (1) Literature of the World course from the following.

  • This course is a survey of world literature that explores human experience by examining diverse aesthetic and cultural perspectives from ancient to modern times.

  • This course is a survey of important works of world literature from ancient times through the mid-seventeenth century.

  • This course is a survey of important works of world literature from the mid-seventeenth century to the present.

  • This course is a survey of important works of British literature.

  • This course is a survey of important works of British literature from the Old English period through the neoclassical age.

  • This course is a survey of important works of American literature.

  • This course is a survey of American literature from the pre-colonial age to the mid-nineteenth century.

  • This course is a survey of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present.

  • This course is a survey of important works of African-American literature.

Select one (1) Arts and Culture of the World course from the following.

  • This interactive course is an introduction to the role of visual art in global societies, from antiquity through the present day. It examines various media within their social, historical, and intellectual contexts; explores a variety of art-historical, art-critical, and theoretical issues; and facilitates critical and analytical thinking. It also teaches students how to analyze the basic elements of art and design and how to visit a museum. (Visits to some venues may require paid admission.)

  • Through an examination of the role of arts in society, and an in-depth study of selected dance events, this interactive course provides an understanding of the creative process and develops skills in creativity and critical analysis. Heightened perceptual abilities will be developed through class experiences and field visits to a variety of arts events in dance, music, visual arts, and theater. (Attendance at some events requires paid admission.)

  • This course examines the role of music in society through a study of musical works within their cultural and historical contexts. Course assignments develop skills in critical analysis and global perspectives as well as an understanding of the creative process. Required attendance at live performances provides the experiential component so crucial to the understanding and enjoyment of music. (Most events require paid admission.)

  • This interactive course examines the role of theatre in society through the study of dramatic works and performance events within their cultural and historical contexts. Course assignments promote understanding of the creative process and develop skills in critical analysis, global perspectives, and collaboration. Attendance is required at live performances, including some events with paid admission.

Area D: Science, Mathematics & Technology (12 credit hours)

Broad Field Education (Biology Emphasis)

  • This course is the first in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes electronic structure of atoms and molecules, bonding fundamentals, fundamentals of chemical reactions, and gas laws.

  • First laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to introduce the student to the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory.

  • This course is the second in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, liquids and solids, properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and qualitative analysis.

  • Second laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to continue the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory including qualitative analysis techniques.

  • This course is the first in the calculus curriculum and introduces the central concepts of calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable, applications of these concepts and a brief introduction to the integral of a function.

Chemistry Education

  • This course is the second in the calculus curriculum and consists of two parts. The first part is concerned with the techniques of integration and applications of the integral. The second part is concerned with infinite sequences and series.

  • This course is an introductory calculus-based course on classical mechanics, waves, and special relativity. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in kinematics and dynamics, use the law of universal gravitation to analyze the behavior of falling objects and objects in orbital motion, describe simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves, and explain the basic ideas of special relativity.

  • PHYS 2211L is an introductory laboratory for the calculus-based course on classical mechanics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements of simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed, as well as graphical techniques and the method of least-squares fits.

  • This course is an introductory calculus-based course on electromagnetism, physical optics, and quantum physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric potential to problems in electrostatics and with electric currents, describe the motion of charged particles in magnetic fields and induction, explain the origin of electromagnetic waves and properties of light, determine the behavior of light waves passing through single or multiple slits, and understand elementary principles of quantum physics.

  • This is an introductory laboratory for the calculus-based course on electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric currents to problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements on magnetic fields and induction, optics, and elementary quantum physics phenomena. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed, along with graphical techniques and least-squares fits.

Physics Education

  • This course is the first in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes electronic structure of atoms and molecules, bonding fundamentals, fundamentals of chemical reactions, and gas laws.

  • First laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to introduce the student to the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory.

  • This course is the second in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, liquids and solids, properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and qualitative analysis.

  • Second laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to continue the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory including qualitative analysis techniques.

  • This course is the second in the calculus curriculum and consists of two parts. The first part is concerned with the techniques of integration and applications of the integral. The second part is concerned with infinite sequences and series.

Mathematics Education

  • This course is the second in the calculus curriculum and consists of two parts. The first part is concerned with the techniques of integration and applications of the integral. The second part is concerned with infinite sequences and series.

Select two (2) science courses from the following. There is no lab required in the second course.

  • BIOL 1107: Biological Principles I
    The course is an introduction to cell and molecular biology as well as molecular and population genetics. Students who successfully complete the class should be able to describe the fundamental biology of the cell, including cellular anatomy and cellular metabolic processes in both plants and animals. Students will also use molecular genetics to describe the basis for heredity and how this is expressed in populations as well as how it informs evolutionary principles.

    BIOL 1107L: Biological Principles I Laboratory
    This lab complements BIOL 1107. Students will learn how to use scientific equipment to explore the cell and molecular biology in plant and animals as well as the biochemistry of life. Students will learn about experimental design and how to generate and interpret scientific data.

    BIOL 1108: Biological Principles II
    This is the second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles of biology. Students will explore the evolution and diversity of life in this course. Students will have additional focus on organismal anatomy and physiology as well as learning basic principles of ecology.

  • CHEM 1211: General Chemistry I
    This course is the first in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes electronic structure of atoms and molecules, bonding fundamentals, fundamentals of chemical reactions, and gas laws.

    CHEM 1211L: General Chemistry I Laboratory
    First laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to introduce the student to the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory.

    CHEM 1212: General Chemistry II
    This course is the second in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, liquids and solids, properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and qualitative analysis.

  • PHYS 1111: Introductory Physics I
    This is an introductory algebra and trigonometry-based course on classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in kinematics and dynamics, use the law of universal gravitation to falling objects and orbital motion, describe simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves, and explain temperature, heat, and entropy.

    PHYS 1111L: Introductory Physics Laboratory I
    PHYS 1111L is an introductory laboratory for the trigonometry-based course on classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements of simple harmonic motion, oscillations, waves, temperature, and basic fluid dynamics. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed.

    PHYS 1112: Introductory Physics II
    This course is an introductory algebra and trigonometry-based course on electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric potential to problems in electrostatics and with electric currents, describe the motion of charged particles in magnetic fields and induction, explain the origin of electromagnetic waves and properties of light, and understand elementary principles of special relativity and quantum physics.

  • PHYS 2211: Principles of Physics I
    This course is an introductory calculus-based course on classical mechanics, waves, and special relativity. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in kinematics and dynamics, use the law of universal gravitation to analyze the behavior of falling objects and objects in orbital motion, describe simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves, and explain the basic ideas of special relativity.

    PHYS 2211L: Principles of Physics Laboratory I
    PHYS 2211L is an introductory laboratory for the calculus-based course on classical mechanics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements of simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed, as well as graphical techniques and the method of least-squares fits.

    PHYS 2212: Principles of Physics II
    This course is an introductory calculus-based course on electromagnetism, physical optics, and quantum physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric potential to problems in electrostatics and with electric currents, describe the motion of charged particles in magnetic fields and induction, explain the origin of electromagnetic waves and properties of light, determine the behavior of light waves passing through single or multiple slits, and understand elementary principles of quantum physics.

Area E: Social Sciences (12 credit hours)

  • This course examines the institutions and processes of American government and Georgia State government. Global comparisons are made between the governments of the U.S. and other modern nation-states.

  • This course provides students with the knowledge and tools necessary to critically examine the development and integration of science, technology, and society. The course seeks to help students better understand the world in which they live, the broader implications of their major course of study, and the complex social, ethical, and moral choices presented by modern science and technology in human relationships.

Select one (1) U.S. History course from the following.

  • This course explores major themes in the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the peoples of North America to 1877. Topics include the intersections of cultures in colonial America, the origin and development of the American republic, the evolution of democratic ideas and institutions, western expansion, slavery, sectional conflict, and emancipation and its aftermath.

  • This course examines the major themes in the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the United States since 1877, the multicultural nature of contemporary U.S. civilization, and the nation’s role in the global arena.

Select one (1) World History course from the following.

  • Successful completion of all Learning Support English requirements An overview of world history that provides an introduction to the origin and development of the world’s societies and their political, cultural, and economic traditions.

  • This course is a survey of world history to early modern times. The course examines the political, economic, social, and cultural history of the world with a focus on connections and interactions.

  • This course is a survey of world history from early modern times to the present. The course examines themes, events, trends, institutions, and ideas with a focus on global connections and interactions.

Foundations for Healthy Living Requirement: 3 credit hours

  • This course is designed to examine priority health issues impacting KSU students through a focus on health promotion and disease prevention. Emphasis is placed on achieving and maintaining healthy lifestyles by developing effective strategies to adapt to changing personal and environmental factors. Topics of exploration include physical activity, nutrition, weight management, stress, emotional health, and behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death and disabilities in the United States.

First-Year Curriculum Requirement: 3 credit hours

All first-year full-time students entering Kennesaw State University with fewer than 15 semester hours are required to complete a First-Year Seminar or enroll in a Learning Community and complete all courses that comprise it. This requirement must be satisfied during a student's first term of enrollment at Kennesaw State University. Students who choose to satisfy the requirement by taking a first-year seminar should work closely with their academic advisors to determine where and how the course fits into their program of study.

First-Year Seminar courses

  • This course is a first-year seminar designed to help students develop college-level skills for academic success by focusing on life skills, strategies for academic success, connecting with campus and community, and foundations for global learning. This course guides student through the transition from high school to higher education. It satisfies the first-year curriculum requirement by meeting the four learning outcomes of the first-year seminars.

  • This course examines research-based projections of what the world will look like in 25 years due to the influence of seven global challenges, specifically population, resource management, technology, information/knowledge, economic integration, conflict, and governance. Students will analyze the impact of these issues on their own lives. This course satisfies the first-year curriculum requirement by meeting the four learning outcomes of first-year seminars.

  • In this course, students work to make a difference in the world through research- and skills-based community engagement projects. Students investigate a world problem, find supporting evidence of the problem’s scope, and offer solutions that culminate in a final community project where academic and life skills relevant to multiple disciplines and careers are applied. This course satisfies the first-year curriculum requirement by meeting the four learning outcomes of first-year seminars.

  • This course enhances first-year students’ leadership skills and cultivates their knowledge of leadership theory and application. Through experiential learning projects, students practice leadership on campus and in the community while developing life skills, connections with the university, academic success strategies, and global perspectives. This course satisfies the first-year curriculum requirement by meeting the four learning outcomes of the first-year seminars.

Area F: Lower Division Major Requirements (18 credit hours)

All Concentrations

  • This course engages potential education candidates in observations and interactions in schools, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Candidates investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Candidates actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, candidates reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture. Includes the use of current technologies which are directly related to effective teaching and 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • This course introduces teachers to fundamental knowledge of culture essential for effective teaching in increasingly diverse classrooms. Designed as a foundation course for subsequent courses focused on the preparation of culturally responsive teachers, this course examines 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definition and implications of diversity. Includes 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting-elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • This course explores key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. Includes 10 hours of observation and interaction with a learner in a naturalistic setting. Current use of technology will be integrated as communication and instructional tools. Verification of professional liability insurance is required.

Broad Field Education (Biology Emphasis)

  • The course is an introduction to cell and molecular biology as well as molecular and population genetics. Students who successfully complete the class should be able to describe the fundamental biology of the cell, including cellular anatomy and cellular metabolic processes in both plants and animals. Students will also use molecular genetics to describe the basis for heredity and how this is expressed in populations as well as how it informs evolutionary principles.

  • This lab complements BIOL 1107. Students will learn how to use scientific equipment to explore the cell and molecular biology in plant and animals as well as the biochemistry of life. Students will learn about experimental design and how to generate and interpret scientific data.

  • This is the second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles of biology. Students will explore the evolution and diversity of life in this course. Students will have additional focus on organismal anatomy and physiology as well as learning basic principles of ecology.

  • This lab corresponds with the organismal biology topics covered in BIOL 1108 lecture. Students will examine phylogenetics, organismal diversity, ecological principles, and physiology through a combination of lab observations and hypothesis-testing experiments. Students are also expected to perform a fetal pig dissection in order to explore vertebrate anatomy. Application of the methods of experimental design, data analysis, and data presentation will be a major component of this course.

Chemistry Education

  • This course is the first in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes electronic structure of atoms and molecules, bonding fundamentals, fundamentals of chemical reactions, and gas laws.

  • First laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to introduce the student to the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory.

  • This course is the second in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, liquids and solids, properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and qualitative analysis.

  • Second laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to continue the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory including qualitative analysis techniques.

Physics Education

  • This course is the third in the calculus curriculum and is concerned with functions defined on regions in two or three dimensional space and that have values in one, two, or three dimensional space. Topics include partial derivatives, vector fields, multiple integrals, and applications of these topics.

  • This is the third course in the 3-semester introductory sequence. Students will learn about pressures produced by fluids and fluid flow. They will also learn the laws of thermodynamics and their applications to physical systems. Students will also examine the behavior of light interacting with lenses and mirrors, and will understand the behavior of sound in air.

Mathematics Education

  • This course is the third in the calculus curriculum and is concerned with functions defined on regions in two or three dimensional space and that have values in one, two, or three dimensional space. Topics include partial derivatives, vector fields, multiple integrals, and applications of these topics.

  • This course is a foundational, calculus-based introduction to statistics and probability. The following conceptual themes will be developed through the process of statistical investigation: exploratory data analysis (univariate and bivariate), fundamentals of experiment design and sampling, planning and conducting a study, exploring random phenomenon using probability and simulation, and the fundamentals of statistical inference. Technology is integrated into each theme, and the statistical software package used will be chosen by the instructor.

Additional Information

Students must petition to graduate during the semester PRIOR to their graduation semester. See the KSU Registrar’s website for more information.

For more information on advisement in undergraduate education programs, please call Education Student Services at 470.578.6105 or email BCOE_advising@kennesaw.edu. You may also email bsedsmge@kennesaw.edu.

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