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EDL

Educational Leadership

Ed.D. Leadership for Learning - Courses

Core Courses for All Concentrations (12 Hours)

This course is an advanced study of qualitative research methodologies including ethnography, case study, and phenomenology. Students will examine a variety of data sources (e.g. interviews, observations) and methods of analysis (e.g. memo writing, coding). Students will conduct research as they formulate their research questions, collect and analyze data, and write a research report.
This course is an in-depth study of and application of selected quantitative research designs. Course also involves advanced study of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and non-parametric tests traditionally utilized in social and behavioral research. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the process of social and educational research in applied settings. Candidates will deepen their expertise in designing and conducting research and analyzing quantitative data. Candidates will conduct these analyses using quantitative statistical software, interpret their findings, and communicate their results ethically, clearly and effectively.
The course deepens experienced educators’ knowledge of research-based best practices in diverse classrooms. This is an advanced course with in-depth study of classic and current research on learning theories and related topics in educational psychology as they relate to teaching and learning in schools. Focus is on those theories and research which have transformed and are reforming educational practice.
In the doctoral seminar, students will accomplish the following: (1) development of a concept paper that frames the dissertation, and (2) admission to candidacy through a college-approved qualifying experience. This seminar provides opportunities for doctoral students to work individually with members of their respective committees as well as with peers. This is a three-credit seminar that may be repeated. Prior to enrollment, the doctoral student must complete twelve hours of graduate level research coursework.
In the doctoral seminar, students will accomplish the following: (1) development of a concept paper that frames the dissertation, and (2) admission to candidacy through a college-approved qualifying experience. This seminar provides opportunities for doctoral students to work individually with members of their respective committees as well as with peers. This is a three-credit seminar that may be repeated. Prior to enrollment, the doctoral student must complete twelve hours of graduate level research coursework.

Required Concentration Courses (12 Hours)

This course is a second-tier law and policy course, deepening students’ understandings and application of school policy, governance, and regulation. The course particularly focuses on federal and state laws and regulations of students with exceptionalities (including, but not limited to, English-language learners, students in transition, and students with exceptionalities). Through this lens, students will explore policy development and implementation in education.
This course is designed to inform doctoral candidates how policies and practices are developed and implemented through the writing policy briefs in areas of interest. Understanding the value and use of qualitative and quantitative research in the formulation of policies and practices is an integral part of the course. Candidates will focus on the process of policy development and the impact of outside forces on the operation of schools and school districts with the goal of becoming informed practitioners. This course will be of interest to school leaders, policy makers, and those employed in governmental agencies and institutions where decisions are policy driven.
This course introduces the conceptualization of schooling as politics and is designed to help students understand the political contexts and the institutional environment in which educators operate. Through a general awareness of conceptual frameworks (such as system framework, diffusion framework, values, demands and interest groups, micro and macropolitics), used to examine the politics of education, students will obtain, assess, and assemble data and interpret those data to discover connections and contradictions about the concepts from the readings and literature relating to our current educational climate. This course includes a performance-based field experience.
This course explores different strategies for bringing about change leading to curriculum, institutional improvement, evaluation, and reform. The focus is on guiding doctoral candidates toward understanding trends with an emphasis on curriculum, instructional methods, and effective assessments. Candidates will engage in research that identifies political, ethical, and societal changes that impact curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Special attention is given to the educational leader’s role in building a strong, collaborative culture and increasing system’s capactiy to change. This course includes a performance-based field experience.

Elective Courses (12 Hours)

Dissertation (Minimum 9 Hours)

This is the capstone experience for the Doctorate in Leadership for Learning. This is an intensely field-based performance activity in that the candidate demonstrates the ability to apply research skills to solving a P-12 problem of significant importance and that impacts student learning. With the guidance of a dissertation advisor and a committee, the candidate assumes the responsiblity for completing the study and defending both process and results to the dissertation committee.
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