impacting-lives.jpg

SMGE

Secondary & Middle Grades Education

Ed.D. Middle Grades Language Arts - Courses

Education & Research Core (27 hours)

The course deepens experienced educators’ knowledge of research-based best practices in diverse classrooms. This is an advanced course with in-depth study of classic and current research on learning theories and related topics in educational psychology as they relate to teaching and learning in schools. Focus is on those theories and research which have transformed and are reforming educational practice.
This course provides a critical analysis of K-12 education policy at the national, state, and local levels. Topics include issues related to historical, political, cultural, and social contexts of American education. Students examine institutions and processes of public policymaking, the values and assumptions that underlie different types of policies, the political factors that shape their formulation and implementation, and the links between policy and educational practice. The goal of the course is to help teachers think critically about education policy and its influences on their students as learners. Successful candidates will complete a Teaching for Transformative Change Product that includes a) critical analysis of local, state, and national policies as they impact change at all educational levels, b) contextual analysis and evaluation of influence of select policy upon student learning at the classroom and school levels, c) proposal for transformative change, d) proposal for evaluation, e) collected literature and resources.
This course offers a theoretical, historical, and practical foundation in critical multicultural and global education. Candidates will gain an understanding of how structures, policies, and practices of schools in U.S. and global contexts tend to perpetuate discriminatory inequities by their effects on students and teachers. Candidates will examine their own identities, cultural assumptions, and instructional practices to enact a philosophy of teaching that disrupts deficit discourses and ensures equitable outcomes for all learners.
This seminar focuses on critically reviewing research and applying best-practices in formative assessment. Recent research reports effective use of formative assessment enhances student learning and teaching effectiveness. Specific topics include barriers and misconceptions to the formative assessment process, effective practices in formative assessment, theoretical underpinnings of formative assessment, relationships of formative assessment to self-regulated learning and learner autonomy. Additionally, attention will be paid to multicultural formative assessment procedures and concerns relevant to external assessment programs.
This course prepares professional educators to examine the relationship between the research base and applied practice especially as they relate to diverse learners (academically and/or culturally and linguistically). Candidates will examine the characteristics and needs of English language learners and students with exceptionalities, explore evidence-based practices for specific populations, employ a curriculum decision-making process that aligns with the Georgia Performance Standards and the Common Core, and translates to improved pedagogy and student achievement, and critically analyze existing curriculum guidelines as they relate to traditionally marginalized learners.
This course will serve as an introduction to qualitative research and methodologies. Methodological origins, theoretical frameworks, literature reviews, and basic methods of data collection and data analysis will be explored in conjunction with an analysis of relevant literature, educational research reports, and ethics in research. Students will apply basic skills of data collection and analysis. Students will differentiate between the types of qualitative research.
Candidates will demonstrate a functional understanding of the nature and design of quantitative research as applied to the educational arena including but not limited to the following topics; the nature and application of descriptive and basic inferential statistics including the concepts of variance, normal distribution, population, sample, power, effect size, hypothesis testing, parametric and nonparametric tests, interaction effects, validity, reliability; the strengths, weaknesses of quantitative research designs; the principles of data collection and analysis using computer software such as SPSS. Candidates will acquire and become proficient in analytical and interpretive skills; and will be prepared to conduct applied quantitative research that will bear positively on schools.
This seminar will assist the doctoral candidate in conceptualizing, indentifying the components of, and articulating the emerging conceptual framework of their dissertation. Under the guidance of the course professor and in consultation with their dissertation chair, the candidate will emerge from the course with a draft his/her conceptual framework which includes the purpose and rationale for his/her research as well as a draft of the theoretical underpinnings of the research described through a review of literature followed by preliminary research questions or hypotheses for his/her dissertation.

Choose 1

This course is an advanced study of qualitative research methodologies including ethnography, case study, and phenomenology. Students will examine a variety of data sources (e.g. interviews, observations) and methods of analysis (e.g. memo writing, coding). Students will conduct research as they formulate their research questions, collect and analyze data, and write a research report.
This course is an in-depth study of and application of selected quantitative research designs. Course also involves advanced study of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and non-parametric tests traditionally utilized in social and behavioral research. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the process of social and educational research in applied settings. Candidates will deepen their expertise in designing and conducting research and analyzing quantitative data. Candidates will conduct these analyses using quantitative statistical software, interpret their findings, and communicate their results ethically, clearly and effectively.

Major (Teaching Field Pedagogy & Teaching Field Content = 24 hours)

Area 1: Teaching Field Pedagogy (9 Credit Hours)
Candidates may choose from the following:

This internship is for advanced specialist and doctoral students interested in teacher education and scholarly work (e.g., research, editing). Teaching internships focus on teaching and learning, curriculum, and assessment. Teaching internships focus on teaching and learning, curriculum, and assessment. Teaching interns will work closely with their professor to determine the scope of the work during the semester (the seminar may extend beyond one semester) and plan, deliver, and evaluate their instruction. Research internships focus on the identification, planning, and implementation of advanced research projects. Research interns will work closely with their professor to design, implement, and analyze research (the seminar may extend beyond one semester). The scope of other internships in scholarly work will be developed collaboratively between the intern and professor. The scope of other internships in scholarly work (e.g., editing journals, coordinating conferences, or revising and developing state standards) will be developed collaboratively between the intern and professor.
This course considers contemporary research addressing the cognitive, psycho-social, physical, and moral development of adolescents in the context of schools, relationships, and culture with applications to diverse P-12 settings. A major focus of the course includes how school, family, and community influences interact with and impact adolescents’ development and how educators, through a learner-centered approach, can support and facilitate positive outcomes for middle and high school students.
A doctoral seminar focused on analysis and problem-solving of a current topic of vital concern relevant to teaching, leading and student learning in schools with a particular emphasis on the contexts of middle and secondary students, classrooms and schools.
Individualized and independent scholarly investigation and research of an important topic involving teaching, leading and student learning in middle and secondary schools. The focus, content and expectations for this study will be formally established by the doctoral student and supervising professor.
This course provides an in-depth study of the foundations, philosophies, and issues of curriculum as they affect teachers who participate in curriculum making as practitioners in the classroom. The course consists of two major components: curriculum theory, which is an interdisciplinary study of philosophical, historical, psychological, social, and cultural foundations of curriculum; and curriculum as it is practiced in secondary and middle schools. The focus of the class is on helping classroom teachers develop a deep understanding of foundations and philosophy of curriculum that will enable them to develop instructional practices to impact student learning.
Students examine the profession and themselves in relation to theories of social justice and service-learning. Investigating opportunities for service-learning in their own classrooms/schools, students will also participate in service-learning experiences themselves either in their own classroom or in the community. Through journaling, discussions, service to others, and readings, autoethnography is the methodology employed to explore the theories and concepts as well as being the end product of the investigation.
This course is designed to build the capacity of teachers to use co-generative and co-teaching to effectively communicate and resolve complex problems that emerge when teaching rigorous content to an increasingly diverse population of P-12 learners. The course is individualized to the candidate and contextualized to the classroom. The readins required for this course assist candidates in identifying, articulating and resolving problems that require a clear understanding of theory-to-practice and practice-to-theory issues related to the examination of student data, classroom management, and improving instruction. Each week the candidates will explore various aspects of co-teaching, including traditional approaches to co-teaching, pre-service co-teaching, co-generative dialogue and reflective practice.

Area 2: Teaching Field Pedagogy (9 Credit Hours)

Technology Course (3 Credit Hours)
Candidates may choose any 2 from the following:

Teacher leaders will read, analyze, and apply seminal and current research in the field of digital media and pedagogies as appropriate to English/Language Arts teaching in P-12 and/or higher education settings. Teacher leaders will examine trends in the research; emerging themes, trends, and research designs; seminal studies in the fields; connections among composing, reading, and digital media as reflected in the research; and research-based applications of technology to all aspects of English/Language Arts Education. Attention will also be paid to use of digital media and pedagogies for the purpose of enhanced student learning in school settings.
This course introduces candidates to pedagogical methods and strategies for using the Internet effectively in the classroom in the candidate’s certification field. Students will experience a variety of Internet technologies and develop strategies for classroom implementation. The course includes guided tours of some of the best educational sites on the World Wide Web and explores ways to integrate use of the Internet into an educational setting. This course introduces students to systematic instructional methods and models for using the Internet effectively in the classroom. Candidates will create lessons that are current, highly motivating, and mentally engaging. Note Offered as an online course.
This course explores introductory topics in multimedia and emerging technologies and their role in education. Course coverage will include both theoretical understanding of multimedia technologies and hands-on experience with software and hardware. Topics may include research related to multimedia and emerging technologies; classroom applications; design and development techniques; hardware and software requirements; digitizing and manipulating images, voice, and video materials; and copyright and ethics. Students will apply instructional design processes and principles to designing and developing multimedia content. There will be a special focus on Internet technologies, such as podcasting. This course will also examine emerging technologies having potential to postively impact student achievement.
This course is designed to provide candidates with technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) and skills to design and develop multimedia and web-based projects to facilitate P-12 student learning. Topics include the design, development, and evaluation of multimedia and web-based learning environments; research related to multimedia and emerging technologies; classroom applications; design and development techniques; hardware and software requirements; digitizing and manipulating images, voice and video materials; universal design; and copyright and ethics. Candidates will apply instructional design processes and principles to design and develop multimedia and web-based projects in the candidate’s certification field. Note Offered as an online course.
This course is designed to provide candidates with knowledge and skills to design and develop multimedia and web-based projects to facilitate student learning. Topcis include media-based tools, distance learning systems, web-based authoring tools, telecommunications tools, and online curricular projects.
Focus is on the current effects and potential of technology for doing, teaching, and learning mathematics. Students explore mathematics as they develop skill in innovative mathematics technologies. Technologies include graphing calculators, data collection technologies (such as CBL, CBR), dynamic geometry software, statistics software, web simulations, web courseware, and other technology tools for mathematics.

Teaching Field Content Courses (12 hours) English/Language Arts – Required Courses:

Teacher leaders will read, analyze, and apply seminal and current research in the field of writing and composing to English/Language Arts teaching in P-12 or higher education settings. Teacher leaders will examine trends in the research; emerging themes, trends, and research designs; seminal studies in the fields of writing and teaching writing; connections among grammar study, teaching conventions, standards, and writing instruction as reflected in the research; and research-based applications of technology to writing and teaching writing. Attention will also be paid to research on grading and assessing writing, writing program assessment, teaching writing to speakers of English as a second language, curricular development in the field of writing, and to writing across the content areas for the purpose of enhanced student learning in school settings.
Teacher leaders will read, analyze, and apply seminal and current research in the field of English/Language Arts Education, and design an applied research study related to English/Language Arts Education in P-12 and/or higher education settings. The project may be one that the teacher leader carries out in a workplace setting or may serve as a pilot study for the dissertation.
Teacher leaders (graduate students enrolled in the course) will read, analyze, and apply seminal and current research in the field of English/Language Arts Education, and design an applied research study related to English/Language Arts Education in P-12 and/or higher education settings. The project may be one that the teacher leader carries out in a workplace setting or may serve as a pilot study for the dissertation.

Note: In addition to teaching field content courses, the following education courses can be taken (WITH FORMAL ADVISOR PRE-APPROVAL) to satisfy requirements in Area 2:

This course focuses on preparing expert teacher-leaders to implement research-based best practices of exemplary schools. Course provides extensive examination of learning theories and their application to diverse classrooms. Current renewal and reform initiatives in American schools are examined in depth with the aim of preparing expert teacher-learders for collaborative roles in their school and district. Note Offered as an online course.
This graduate course for educators focuses on the critical analysis of national and global large-scale educational testing, emphasizing the core principles, trends and issues surrounding the testing and measurement of achievement. This course is deisgned for master-level students without extensive mathematical training and covers topics such as the evolution of testing in the US and globally, issues surrounding testing of students with disabilities or English language learners, item analysis with statistics, test domains, sampling, population, measurement error, reliability, validity, score inflation, factors influencing scale scores, scaling, test statistics, performance-based statistics, and testing bias. Graduate candidates will explore these topics within the frameworks of common large-scale tests. Note Offered as an online course.
With a focus on the adolescent/young adult learner, this course focuses on preparing expert teacher-leaders to implement research-based best practices of exemplary secondary schools. Course provides extensive examination of learning theories and their application to diverse secondary classrooms. Current renewal and reform initiatives in American high schools are examined in depth with the aim of preparing expert teacher-leaders for collaborative roles in their school and district. Note Offered as an online course.
This course focuses on planning, constructing, analyzing, and applying educational assessment to document student performance for instructional and accountability purposes. Specific topics include guidelines for the development of traditional assessment questions, including the use of multiple-choice questions to measure critical thinking and problem-solving skills; guidelines and rubrics for the development and scoring of performance, writing and portfolio assessments; assessing affective outcomes; describing, analyzing and refining data to improve assessment; and the application and interpretation of standardized norm and criterion-referenced measures. Additionally, attention will be paid to multicultural assessment procedures and concerns relevant to external assessment programs. Note Offered as an online course.
This course examines current theoretical and motivational research findings that stress the role of dispositional values in motivation. Six main theories (expectancy-values, attribution, social cognitive, goal, intrinsic, and achievement) will provide a foundation of specialized knowledge of this topic. Additionally, teacher candidates will apply specific motivational principles and research to educational settings to support all students’ development of a positive disposition for learning. Teacher candidates will also examine how motivation is contextually facilitated or constrained by various classroom characteristics and socio-cultural factors. Finally, teacher candidates will examine school-level factors and external school reform efforts and their potential for influencing teacher and student motivation.

Students may be awarded the ED.S. after completion of 30-33 hours; please see program of study for Ed.S. required coursework.

COGNATE/GUIDED ELECTIVES (6 hours): With advisor approval

Dissertation (9 hours)

Course work supports and guides doctoral candidates in the implementation of their research and the development and defense of the dissertation. This format and structure will provide individual time with the Doctoral Committee and collegial and academic support from their peers. Note Course may be repeated as necessary.