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SMGE

Secondary & Middle Grades Education

M.A.T. in Secondary Science

Program of Study

Program Total: 36 Credit Hours

The program includes 36 total hours, including, at least, 15 hours of professional sequence courses and 15 hours of teaching field courses. Candidates will also take an additional six hours of science content area courses to be determined in consultation with their advisors.

Professional Sequence Courses: All courses required for a total of 15 credit hours

Teacher candidates study child and adolescent development, examining influences on learning. Because teaching and learning are not value-neutral, candidates examine and reflect on possible environmental, genetic, cultural, economic, political, and familial influences on their own development and the development of their future students. Theories and principles of learning, motivation, and differentiation are applied to planning, instruction, and assessment. Candidates are introduced to the Universal Design for Learning framework and critical thinking skills.
Candidates access, explore, and modify instructional resources to create lesson plans that employ culturally-responsive, developmentally-appropriate instructional strategies. Lesson plans incorporate the Universal Design for Learning Framework, guiding principles of differentiation, and key formative assessment strategies to produce curriculum that is relevant, challenging, integrative, and exploratory. Candidates practice critical thinking and apply it in the design of instruction. Candidates plan safe, productive learning environments with appropriate organizational structures including opportunities for family and community involvement.
In the EDUC 6260 and EDUC 6265 seminars, teacher candidates apply in school contexts what they’ve learned in EDUC 6250 and 6255 about students, curriculum, instruction, and assessment, including critical thinking, developmentally appropriate instruction, differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and large-scale testing and bias. Teacher candidates practice a cycle of planning, instruction, assessment, and reflection to ensure that they grow in their effectiveness in impacting the learning of all of their students. Particular attention will be paid to culturally responsible pedagogy and professionalism.
In the EDUC 6260 and EDUC 6265 seminars, teacher candidates apply in school contexts what they’ve learned in EDUC 6250 and 6255 about students, curriculum, instruction, and assessment, including critical thinking, developmentally appropriate instruction, differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and large-scale testing and bias. Teacher candidates practice a cycle of planning, instruction, assessment, and reflection to ensure that they grow in their effectiveness in impacting the learning of all of their students. Particular attention will be paid to culturally responsible pedagogy and professionalism.
This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practices in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. This course, along with INED 6411 and INED 6412, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement. Pre-requisite: Admission to the MAT program. Part 1 introduces teacher candidates to the history and laws which govern the education of students with esceptionalities. Emphasis is placed on the origin of the law, the responsibility of the Local Education Agency to abide by the law, the referral and identification process, and the support services offered to students and staff.
This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practices in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. Part 2 gives candidates a thorough understanding of the exceptionality areas recognized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The most common characteristics of each exceptionality area and students who are gifted will be explained and classroom strategies for each will be explored. Candidates will be able to recognize common characteristics and will be able to plan for educational access for each. This course, along with INED 6410 and INED 6412, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement. Pre-requisite: Admission to the MAT program.
This course examines the demographic changes in America’s schools that influence teaching and learning. Attention is given to assisting candidates in developing a socio-cultural consciousness and the disposition that all students, including those with exceptionalities, can learn complex content. Candidates engage in in-depth study of students with dexceptionalities and their educational needs as well as the creation of culturally responsive and inclusive classrooms that support all students. In Part 3, teacher candidates must demonstrate the ability to foster learning environments that are culturally responsive, inclusive, caring and accepting of all individuals. This course prepares prospective content area middle and secondary teachers with a greater understanding of diversity as well as the collaborative tools necessary to bringing all students, including those with exceptionalities, to high educational standards. Universal Design for Learning, differentiation, assistive technology will be the tools taught in this course. The concepts of assessment of and for learning will be emphasized. Pre-requisite: Admission to the MAT program. Successful completion of INED 6410 and INED 6411.
In this course, middle and/or secondary content teachers are introduced to first and second language acquisition, linguistic elements, and linguistically responsive pedagogy. In addition, students will begin to develop an understanding of these concepts as they relate to meeting the needs of English learners and recognizing the vast cultural resources that they bring to the content classroom in relation to the larger sociopolitical context.
This course focuses on developing effective instruction for linguistically diverse students in middle and/or secondary content classrooms. Specifically, teacher candidates will begin to develop the skills necessary for the differentiation, scaffolding, and assessment of content for students that are learning English while also developing content proficiency. The course will introduce prospective teachers to language objectives and academic language as tools for developing content instruction that is comprehensible for English learners.
Teacher candidates will be exposed to formative and summative assessment strategies appropriate for linguistically diverse students. Students will be asked to create and use a variety of rubrics and other appropriate assessment instruments to assess content and developing English language proficiency through speaking, listening, writing, and reading. In addition, the prospective teacher will begin to make connections between instruction and assessment and how this relates to advocacy for English learners as a content teacher.
Teacher candidates learn to use technologies to promote student achievement of required content and technology standards through higher-level thinking, collaboration, problem-solving, and relevant, meaningful learning in their classrooms. Students will also explore digital equity, acceptable use, Internet safety, online learning, and other issues/trends relevant to technology in schools.

Teaching Field Courses: All courses required for a total of 15 credit hours

This is the first of three courses in a professional sequence toward becoming a well-prepared beginning secondary mathematics teacher. Topics include an introduction to the profession, developing classroom culture, and assessment and feedback strategies.
Teacher candidates will plan and implement various lessons (examples include cross-cutting discipline based, problem based, technology based, culturally relevant) that are developmentally appropriate for the learner. Candidates will use available student data and research-based literature and theory to help guide their lesson planning. Candidates will critically reflect upon their work using videos, journals, and discussions.
Teacher candidates will continue to plan and implement various assessments while also learning how to modify their lessons based upon student performance. Candidates will learn how to help their students develop scientific evidence-based arguments and skills that differentiate science from pseudoscience. Finally, candidates will broaden their learning environment to include those stakeholders that are outside of the immediate classroom setting.
This course is the beginning to the co-teaching Yearlong Clinical Experience in education. Candidates will attend the entirety of pre-planning at their assigned school before the start of the academic year (the exact timing of which will depend on the placement school’s schedule). Additionally, candidates will also attend the first week of the academic year in order to familiarize themselves with the policies and routines of their placement school and Collaborating Teacher.
Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor, the intern will complete a teaching experience at a designated school. The experience requires working in a co-teaching environment with diverse learners, including students with special needs and with students who are English learners. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars. NOTES: Proof of professional liability insurance is required prior to school placement.
Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor, the intern will complete a full-time teaching experience at a designated school. The experience requires working in a co-teaching environment with diverse learners, including students with special needs and with students who are English learners. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars and the completion of a content pedagogy assessment. NOTES: Proof of professional liability insurance is required prior to school placement.

Science Content Area Courses: 6 credit hours in biology, chemistry, or physics

Science candidates will take an additional six hours of content area (biology, chemistry, or physics) courses to be determined in consultation with their advisors.

Additional Information

Students must petition to graduate during the semester PRIOR to their graduation semester. See the KSU Registrar’s website for more information.

Contact matsmge@kennesaw.edu for advising.