M.A.T. Secondary English - Courses

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Professional Sequence (12 Credit Hours)

  • Teacher candidates study child and adolescent development, examining influences on learning. Because teaching and learning are not value-neutral, candidates examine and reflect on possible environmental, genetic, cultural, economic, political, and familial influences on their own development and the development of their future students. Theories and principles of learning, motivation, and differentiation are applied to planning, instruction, and assessment. Candidates are introduced to the Universal Design for Learning framework and critical thinking skills.

  • Candidates access, explore, and modify instructional resources to create lesson plans that employ culturally-responsive, developmentally-appropriate instructional strategies. Lesson plans incorporate the Universal Design for Learning Framework, guiding principles of differentiation, and key formative assessment strategies to produce curriculum that is relevant, challenging, integrative, and exploratory. Candidates practice critical thinking and apply it in the design of instruction. Candidates plan safe, productive learning environments with appropriate organizational structures including opportunities for family and community involvement.

  • In the EDUC 6260 and EDUC 6265 seminars, teacher candidates apply in school contexts what they’ve learned in EDUC 6250 and 6255 about students, curriculum, instruction, and assessment, including critical thinking, developmentally appropriate instruction, differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and large-scale testing and bias. Teacher candidates practice a cycle of planning, instruction, assessment, and reflection to ensure that they grow in their effectiveness in impacting the learning of all of their students. Particular attention will be paid to culturally responsible pedagogy and professionalism.

  • In the EDUC 6260 and EDUC 6265 seminars, teacher candidates apply in school contexts what they’ve learned in EDUC 6250 and 6255 about students, curriculum, instruction, and assessment, including critical thinking, developmentally appropriate instruction, differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and large-scale testing and bias. Teacher candidates practice a cycle of planning, instruction, assessment, and reflection to ensure that they grow in their effectiveness in impacting the learning of all of their students. Particular attention will be paid to culturally responsible pedagogy and professionalism.

  • This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practices in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. Part 2 gives candidates a thorough understanding of the exceptionality areas recognized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The most common characteristics of each exceptionality area and students who are gifted will be explained and classroom strategies for each will be explored. Candidates will be able to recognize common characteristics and will be able to plan for educational access for each. This course, along with INED 6410 and INED 6412, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement. Pre-requisite: Admission to the MAT program.

  • This course focuses on developing effective instruction for linguistically diverse students in middle and/or secondary content classrooms. Specifically, teacher candidates will begin to develop the skills necessary for the differentiation, scaffolding, and assessment of content for students that are learning English while also developing content proficiency. The course will introduce prospective teachers to language objectives and academic language as tools for developing content instruction that is comprehensible for English learners.

  • Teacher candidates will be exposed to formative and summative assessment strategies appropriate for linguistically diverse students. Students will be asked to create and use a variety of rubrics and other appropriate assessment instruments to assess content and developing English language proficiency through speaking, listening, writing, and reading. In addition, the prospective teacher will begin to make connections between instruction and assessment and how this relates to advocacy for English learners as a content teacher.

  • This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practices in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. This course, along with INED 6411 and INED 6412, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement. Pre-requisite: Admission to the MAT program. Part 1 introduces teacher candidates to the history and laws which govern the education of students with exceptionalities. Emphasis is placed on the origin of the law, the responsibility of the Local Education Agency to abide by the law, the referral and identification process, and the support services offered to students and staff.

  • This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practices in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. Part 2 gives candidates a thorough understanding of the exceptionality areas recognized under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. The most common characteristics of each exceptionality area and students who are gifted will be explained and classroom strategies for each will be explored. Candidates will be able to recognize common characteristics and will be able to plan for educational access for each. This course, along with INED 6410 and INED 6412, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement. Pre-requisite: Admission to the MAT program.

  • This course examines the demographic changes in America’s schools that influence teaching and learning. Attention is given to assisting candidates in developing a socio-cultural consciousness and the disposition that all students, including those with exceptionalities, can learn complex content. Candidates engage in in-depth study of students with exceptionalities and their educational needs as well as the creation of culturally responsive and inclusive classrooms that support all students. In Part 3, teacher candidates must demonstrate the ability to foster learning environments that are culturally responsive, inclusive, caring and accepting of all individuals. This course prepares prospective content area middle and secondary teachers with a greater understanding of diversity as well as the collaborative tools necessary to bringing all students, including those with exceptionalities, to high educational standards. Universal Design for Learning, differentiation, assistive technology will be the tools taught in this course. The concepts of assessment of and for learning will be emphasized. Pre-requisite: Admission to the MAT program. Successful completion of INED 6410 and INED 6411.

English Teaching Field (30 Credit Hours)

  • This course is an examination and application of curriculum, learning theories, teaching strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for teaching secondary school English/Language Arts in the multicultural and diverse classroom of today. Special focus includes the implications of literacy practices; the importance of discussion-based classrooms; the constructivist teaching of grammar; and the grounding of course content in candidates’ field experiences.

  • This course is the first semester of an intensive and extensive co-teaching yearlong clinical experience in English education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor and working in a diverse environment that includes students with exceptionalities and English learners, candidates practice professional competencies that impact student achievement. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars. Proof of liability insurance is required.

  • Extending upon knowledge and skills developed in ENED 6414, candidates examine and apply curriculum, learning theories, teaching strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for teaching secondary school English/Language Arts in the multicultural and diverse classroom of today. Special focus includes the implications of literacy practices, the importance of discussion-based classrooms, the constructivist teaching of grammar, and the grounding of course content in candidates’ field experiences.

  • This course is the second semester of an intensive and extensive co-teaching yearlong clinical practice in English education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor and working in a diverse environment that includes students with exceptionalities and English learners, candidates practice professional competencies that impact student achievement. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars and the completion of a content pedagogy assessment. Proof of liability insurance is required.

  • This course examines issues and themes in the teaching of literature in middle and high schools. Topics examined include how meaning is derived from texts; the role of critical theory; competing philosophies for which texts should be read and why; how and to what purpose we read; how readers are positioned; standards, policies, and censorship; and approaches for teaching texts, literary analysis, and argument anchored in student relevance, democratic culture, and human potential.

  • This course is a study of the range of texts (conventional, multimodal, nonfiction, film, etc.) possible in the English Language Arts classroom, with attention to and analysis of genre conventions, embedded literacy practices, and student reception and production.

  • A study of language as a key component of English/Language Arts. Topics include understanding English’s historical and ongoing development, learning English as a second language, using discourse appropriately in a variety of contexts, dialect variations, relationships between oral and written language use, and issues involved in teaching language (e.g., teaching grammar in context).

  • A survey of issues and themes in composition studies, especially those which have influenced writing instruction in the schools. Topics examined include writing as a process and writing for a variety of purposes, audiences, and genres, as well as approaches for evaluating writing and for planning writing instruction that invites students to use the art of writing for exploring authentic issues that matter in their lives.

  • Focus on the current effects and potential of technology and multimedia in writing, reading and literature instruction. Students explore ways technology is changing reading and writing processes in school, the workplace and in daily life and develop effective ways of integrating technology into instructional programs.

NOTE: Other courses may count in the Teaching Field areas with the approval of the advisor.

Program Total (42 Credit Hours)

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