B.S. in Secondary Education Courses

COURSES FAQS OVERVIEW KSU CATALOG

Program of Study
Program Total: 120-124 Credit Hours

The program includes 120-124 total hours (depending on concentration), including, at least, 33 hours of professional sequence courses. All students complete 60 total hours of General Education courses. The number of hours required for upper division courses vary depending on concentration:

  • Mathematics Education - 27 credit hours
  • Chemistry Education - 28 credit hours
  • Physics Education - 30 credit hours
  • Broad Field Education (Biology Emphasis) - 31 credit hours

General Education Requirements (42 Credit Hours)

The B.S. in Education in Secondary Education has General Education requirements that are specific to the program. Students should consult both the Program of Study in the Undergraduate Catalog and Kennesaw State University's General Education requirements to ensure that they have completed all requirements of the program, in addition to consulting with their advisor in Education Student Services

SEE LISTING OF GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

Lower Division Major Requirements (Area F) (15-17 Credit Hours)

  • This course engages potential education candidates in observations and interactions in schools, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Candidates investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Candidates actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, candidates reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture. Includes the use of current technologies which are directly related to effective teaching and 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

    Notes: Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • This course introduces teachers to fundamental knowledge of culture essential for effective teaching in increasingly diverse classrooms. Designed as a foundation course for subsequent courses focused on the preparation of culturally responsive teachers, this course examines 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definition and implications of diversity. Includes 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting-elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • This course explores key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. Includes 10 hours of observation and interaction with a learner in a naturalistic setting. Current use of technology will be integrated as communication and instructional tools. Verification of professional liability insurance is required.

  • MATH 2203: Calculus III
    This course is the third in the calculus curriculum and is concerned with functions defined on regions in two or three dimensional space and that have values in one, two, or three dimensional space. Topics include partial derivatives, vector fields, multiple integrals, and applications of these topics.

    MATH 2332: Probability and Data Analysis
    This course is a foundational, calculus-based introduction to statistics and probability. The following conceptual themes will be developed through the process of statistical investigation: exploratory data analysis (univariate and bivariate), fundamentals of experiment design and sampling, planning and conducting a study, exploring random phenomenon using probability and simulation, and the fundamentals of statistical inference. Technology is integrated into each theme, and the statistical software package used will be chosen by the instructor.

  • BIOL 1107: Biological Principles I
    The course is an introduction to cell and molecular biology as well as molecular and population genetics. Students who successfully complete the class should be able to describe the fundamental biology of the cell, including cellular anatomy and cellular metabolic processes in both plants and animals. Students will also use molecular genetics to describe the basis for heredity and how this is expressed in populations as well as how it informs evolutionary principles.

    BIOL 1107L: Biological Principles I Laboratory
    This lab complements BIOL 1107. Students will learn how to use scientific equipment to explore the cell and molecular biology in plant and animals as well as the biochemistry of life. Students will learn about experimental design and how to generate and interpret scientific data.

    BIOL 1108: Biological Principles II
    This is the second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles of biology. Students will explore the evolution and diversity of life in this course. Students will have additional focus on organismal anatomy and physiology as well as learning basic principles of ecology.

    BIOL 1108L: Biological Principles II Laboratory
    This lab corresponds with the organismal biology topics covered in BIOL 1108 lecture. Students will examine phylogenetics, organismal diversity, ecological principles, and physiology through a combination of lab observations and hypothesis-testing experiments. Students are also expected to perform a fetal pig dissection in order to explore vertebrate anatomy. Application of the methods of experimental design, data analysis, and data presentation will be a major component of this course.

  • CHEM 1211: General Chemistry I
    This course is the first in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes electronic structure of atoms and molecules, bonding fundamentals, fundamentals of chemical reactions, and gas laws.

    CHEM 1211L: General Chemistry I Laboratory
    First laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to introduce the student to the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory.

    CHEM 1212: General Chemistry II
    This course is the second in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes chemical kinetics, chemical thermodynamics, liquids and solids, properties of solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, and qualitative analysis.

    CHEM 1212L: General Chemistry II Laboratory
    Second laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to continue the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory including qualitative analysis techniques.

  • MATH 2203: Calculus III
    This course is the third in the calculus curriculum and is concerned with functions defined on regions in two or three dimensional space and that have values in one, two, or three dimensional space. Topics include partial derivatives, vector fields, multiple integrals, and applications of these topics.

    PHYS 2213: Principles of Physics III
    This is the third course in the 3-semester introductory sequence. Students will learn about pressures produced by fluids and fluid flow. They will also learn the laws of thermodynamics and their applications to physical systems. Students will also examine the behavior of light interacting with lenses and mirrors, and will understand the behavior of sound in air.

Major Requirements

Depending on a student's concentration, the Major requirements may consist of 27-31 credit hours.

Major Requirements: Mathematics Education (27 Credit Hours)

Students must take the following courses plus three credit hours from any MATH/STAT 3000/4000 level courses, except MATH 3316, MATH 3317, MATH 3390.

Note: At most, nine total hours of credit can be given for MATH 3398 and, at most, three of those hours can be used as a Major requirements elective.

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION PROGRAM MAP
 
  • This course introduces to students the foundations of logic, set theory, and basic proof techniques. The course serves as a bridge from the procedural and computational understanding of mathematics to a broad understanding encompassing logical reasoning, generalization, abstraction, axiomatic approach, and formal proof.

  • An introduction to linear algebra and some of its classical and modern applications. Among topics to be included will be systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants of matrices and applications, vector spaces, and inner product spaces. Significant use of technology will be employed in performing matrix computations.

  • Designed for the preservice teacher of mathematics for adolescents. Content strands to be explored include number and operation, algebra, and measurement. The process standards of communication, connections, problem solving, reasoning and proof, and representation will be emphasized. Appropriate use of manipulatives, calculators and software will be integrated in course materials.

  • Designed to prepare prospective 5-8 teachers and 6-12 teachers to become effective facilitators in teaching geometry, this course develops geometry as an axiomatic mathematical system and approaches it from synthetic, transformational, and algebraic perspectives (including higher dimensions). Various geometries are studied including finite, infinite, projective, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean.

  • Students will investigate classical and modern mathematics through problem-solving and mathematics-specific technologies. Students will have opportunities to connect course content with the middle and secondary school curriculum.

    Notes: Must be admitted to Teacher Education Program before taking this course.

  • Students’ understanding of the mathematics taught in middle school and the first few years of high school will be deepened and broadened through the study of key topics including algebra, linear functions, exponential functions, quadratic functions, number theory, discrete mathematics, and mathematical modeling. This course is designed so that students can revisit key ideas in school mathematics, bringing with them the skills and understandings of college course work in mathematics, deepening and broadening their understanding, and connecting more advanced ideas to the topics they will teach in middle school and high school.

  • An introduction to the fundamental structures of abstract algebra (groups, rings, and fields), the connections of these structures with the algebra studied at the elementary level, and the historical development of modern algebra. The emphasis in this course is on groups.

  • Students understanding of secondary mathematics will be deepened and broadened through the study of algebraic structures, analytic geometry, and trigonometry, including conic sections, complex numbers, polynomials and functions. This course is designed so that students can revisit key ideas in high school mathematics, bringing with them the skills and understandings of college course work in mathematics, deepening and broadening their understanding, and connecting more advanced ideas to the topics they will teach in high school.

Major Requirements: Broad Field Education (Biology Emphasis) (31 Credit Hours)

BROAD FIELD EDUCATION (BIOLOGY EMPHASIS) PROGRAM MAP
 
  • BIOL 3300: Genetics
    This course presents fundamental principles and applications in genetics. Students learn how traits are inherited and to use this information in predicting and analyzing genetic outcomes. Students study nucleic acid structure, learn how DNA replicates and how genes are expressed. Mutation at the gene and chromosomal levels will be surveyed, and their effect on gene structure and function examined. Finally, students will explore various genetic methods, including pedigrees, mapping, and molecular techniques.

    BIOL 3300L: Genetics Laboratory
    This course is designed to reinforce principles and applications of transmission genetics, cytogenetics, and molecular genetics. Students will learn to use problem-solving, data analysis and quantitative methods to explore genetics. Exercises in molecular biology will expose students to methods of recombinant DNA technology.

  • BIOL 3340: Microbiology
    This course is a study of prokaryotes, unicellular eukaryotes and viruses. Students will learn about the nature of microorganisms and the techniques used to study microbes. Students will explore the morphology, metabolism, growth, and genetics of various microbes.

    BIOL 3340L: Microbiology Laboratory
    This course emphasizes basic microbiology methods. Students will learn to culture, identify and quantify microorganisms. Students will also explore applications of microbiology, including food and environmental microbiology

  • BIOL 3370: Ecology
    Relationships among living organisms and their environments at the individual, population, community and ecosystem level.

    BIOL 3370L: Ecology Laboratory
    In laboratory and field activities students will utilize inquiry-based activities that emphasize environmental sampling procedures and statistical analysis of data to explore the role of variability and uncertainty in scientific decision-making as related to ecological processes.

  • BIOL 4350K: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
    Students will explore a survey of representative vertebrates and related chordates emphasizing phylogeny and anatomical adaptations. Students will investigate evolutionary trends in the context of large-scale environmental changes that have occurred over geologic time. Using a comparative, systems-based approach, students will explore the relationships between structure and function. In the lab, students will learn to dissect selected vertebrate organisms and study anatomical adaptations among these representative models to recognize the relationships between form and function.

    OR

    BIOL 4431: Human Physiology
    This course is designed to introduce biology majors to the fundamentals of mammalian physiology, with the human as the model organism. This course emphasizes the normal functioning of the human body, homeostatic mechanisms, and the relationship between form and function; however, disease states will be described at various times to illustrate how normal functions become disrupted.

    BIOL 4431L: Human Physiology Laboratory
    In this laboratory students will learn how to measure physiological variables across systems using human and non-human models. Students will explore the principles of homeostasis across systems complementing the lecture by gathering and communicating the analysis of appropriate data from a number of experimental systems.

  • An introduction to basic earth science concepts and methodology (including geology, meteorology, and oceanography) will be covered. Special emphasis will be placed on dynamic Earth processes (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanism, climate, etc.) and their effects on the structure and composition of the landforms, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. The lab component includes hands-on evaluation of a collection of Igneous, Metamorphic and Sedimentary rocks, topographic map analyses, spectral imaging and remote sensing, and modeling weather related phenomena.

  • In this course students use descriptive statistics and visual displays to describe data. They learn about some common population and sample distributions. They perform and analyze results of statistical inferences, including confidence intervals, correlation, linear regression, odds/risk ratios, and hypothesis testing (F and T-tests for regression, Chi-square for independence, 2 group and paired sample t-tests). Analyses are performed using MS-Excel. The student is required to select, analyze and interpret real life data for a project.

  • PHYS 1111: Introductory Physics I
    This is an introductory algebra and trigonometry-based course on classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in kinematics and dynamics, use the law of universal gravitation to falling objects and orbital motion, describe simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves, and explain temperature, heat, and entropy.

    PHYS 1111L: Introductory Physics Laboratory I
    PHYS 1111L is an introductory laboratory for the trigonometry-based course on classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements of simple harmonic motion, oscillations, waves, temperature, and basic fluid dynamics. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed.

    PHYS 1112: Introductory Physics II
    This course is an introductory algebra and trigonometry-based course on electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric potential to problems in electrostatics and with electric currents, describe the motion of charged particles in magnetic fields and induction, explain the origin of electromagnetic waves and properties of light, and understand elementary principles of special relativity and quantum physics.

    PHYS 1112L: Introductory Physics Laboratory II
    PHYS 1112L is an introductory laboratory for the trigonometry-based course on electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric currents to problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements on magnetic fields and induction, optics, and elementary quantum physics phenomena. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed, along with graphical techniques and least-squares fits.

Major Requirements: Chemistry Education (28 Credit Hours)

CHEMISTRY EDUCATION PROGRAM MAP
 
  • This one semester course in physical chemistry provides a survey of thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, and kinetics. It also includes an introduction to the quantum mechanical principles important in understanding molecular spectroscopy and molecular modeling.

  • CHEM 3105: Inorganic Chemistry
    In-depth study of concepts and theories of inorganic chemistry. Topics include atomic structure, bonding, coordination chemistry, reaction mechanisms, symmetry, and a general survey of descriptive inorganic chemistry.

    CHEM 3105L: Inorganic Synthesis
    Laboratory course to introduce the concepts and practices of inorganic synthetic chemistry. Emphasis is on the synthesis, characterization, reactivity, structure, and other properties of the inorganic compounds and complexes. The course introduces standard methodology for the synthesis and characterization of compounds.

  • CHEM 3361: Modern Organic Chemistry I
    This course is the first of a two-semester sequence in modern organic chemistry. The course includes a study of structure, properties, synthesis, and reactions of basic organic compounds using modern structural and mechanical theories.

    CHEM 3361L: Modern Organic Chemistry Lab I
    Laboratory experiments designed to introduce the students to modern experimental method used in organic chemistry for separation of mixture, purification of compounds, and reactions illustrating single functional group transformation.

  • CHEM 3362: Modern Organic Chemistry II
    This course is the second of a two-semester sequence in modern organic chemistry. The course includes a study of structure, properties, synthesis, and reactions of basic organic compounds using modern structural and mechanical theories.

    CHEM 3362L: Modern Organic Chemistry Lab II
    Laboratory experiments designed to introduce the students to modern experimental methods used in organic chemistry synthesis, characterization of compounds, and multi-step synthesis of useful target-compounds from readily available starting material.

  • CHEM 3500: Biochemistry
    This course is a one-semester, lecture-only biochemistry course. Concepts covered include the structure and function of biomolecules, membranes, enzyme kinetics, metabolism and bioenergetics, as well as biological information flow. Intended for chemistry, biology, or biotechnology majors.

    Notes: Biochemistry majors are required to take CHEM 3501/L and CHEM 3502.

    CHEM 3500L: Biochemistry Laboratory
    This laboratory serves as an introduction to biochemistry laboratory techniques and includes biochemical applications of spectroscopy, electrophoresis and chromatography. CHEM 3500L is a laboratory companion to CHEM 3500 and is taken by general chemistry, forensic, professional, and chemistry education track chemistry majors and others needing a one semester biochemistry course with laboratory. This laboratory is not intended for biochemistry majors.

  • CHEM 3700: Environmental Chemistry
    This course will cover the environmental chemistry involving the transport, distribution, reactions, and speciation of inorganic, organometallic and organic chemicals occurring in the air, soil and water environments at the local, national and global scale. Environmental transformations and degradation processes, toxicology, pollution and hazardous substances will be discussed.

    OR

    CHEM 3400: The Teaching and Learning of Chemistry
    An introduction to the methods of effective chemistry teaching in both the classroom and laboratory settings. Current chemical education research literature on topics such as theories of teaching, active learning strategies, misconceptions, multiculturalism, laboratory design, demonstrations, and assessment will be introduced and discussed. Class meetings will include hands-on activities where demonstrations and laboratory investigations are designed, enacted, and assessed as well as discussions about research-based best practices in the presentation of chemistry concepts to diverse student populations. Time will also be devoted to ensuring that essential chemistry content such as electro chemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics, and bonding are thoroughly understood so that they can be communicated effectively in the classroom.

    OR

    SCI 3360: Earth Science
    An introduction to basic earth science concepts and methodology (including geology, meteorology, and oceanography) will be covered. Special emphasis will be placed on dynamic Earth processes (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanism, climate, etc.) and their effects on the structure and composition of the landforms, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. The lab component includes hands-on evaluation of a collection of Igneous, Metamorphic and Sedimentary rocks, topographic map analyses, spectral imaging and remote sensing, and modeling weather related phenomena.

  • CHEM 2800: Quantitative Analytical Chemistry
    This course introduces students to statistics; the use of spreadsheets; principles of gravimetric and volumetric analysis; concepts of chemical equilibria as applied to acid-base, precipitation and complex ion reactions; electrochemistry and potentiometry; ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy; and an introduction to modern chromatographic separations.

    CHEM 2800L: Quantitative Analytical Chemistry Laboratory
    Laboratory experiments include: gravimetric analysis, precipitation, complexiometric, and reduction-oxidation titrations; potentiometric applications; calibration techniques using ultraviolet - visible spectroscopy. Tutorials on the application of spreadsheets.

Major Requirements: Physics Education (30 Credit Hours)

PHYSICS EDUCATION PROGRAM MAP
 
  • This course is a survey of Newtonian dynamics of particles and systems of particles, central force systems, and the theory of small vibrations. Students will learn how to apply different mathematical techniques such as Lagrange’s equations, Hamiltonian Principles to solve these mechanical systems.

  • This course is a survey of fundamental principles of electricity and magnetism. Students will learn and solve problems in electrostatic fields, magnetic fields of steady currents, and time-dependent electromagnetic fields.

  • Students will use a Windows-based Mathcad software environment to perform numerical and symbolic manipulations of equations arising in physics. In addition, they will solve physics problems and analyze physical situations using a collection of problems particularly suited to software analysis.

  • PHYS 3710: Modern Physics
    PHYS 3710 will present an introduction to the concepts and calculations involved in understanding the structure of matter and the world of the quantum. Students will explore the Planck theory of radiation and wave/particle duality. Students will also calculate Schrodinger equation solutions for simple potentials, and properties of the one-electron atom. Students will also study applications of quantum principles to atomic, molecular, and nuclear structure as time permits.

    PHYS 3720L: Modern Physics Laboratory
    This course, complements the material in Modern Physics. Students will gather data in x-ray diffraction, photoelectric effect and beta decay. They will also estimate the e/m ratio and study the spectra of hydrogen, helium and mercury.

  • This course presents a systematic development of quantum mechanical laws, emphasizing solutions to Schrodinger’s equation for various potentials. In addition, the concept of spin will be presented.

  • MATH 2306: Ordinary Differential Equations
    An introduction to the theory of ordinary differential equations (ODEs), methods of solving first and higher order linear differential equations and linear systems, some applications in the sciences and engineering, the Laplace transform and its application in solving differential equations and linear systems, stability analysis and Euler’s numerical algorithm.

    PHYS 2211: Principles of Physics I
    This course is an introductory calculus-based course on classical mechanics, waves, and special relativity. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in kinematics and dynamics, use the law of universal gravitation to analyze the behavior of falling objects and objects in orbital motion, describe simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves, and explain the basic ideas of special relativity.

    PHYS 2211L: Principles of Physics Laboratory I
    PHYS 2211L is an introductory laboratory for the calculus-based course on classical mechanics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements of simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed, as well as graphical techniques and the method of least-squares fits.

    PHYS 2212: Principles of Physics II
    This course is an introductory calculus-based course on electromagnetism, physical optics, and quantum physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric potential to problems in electrostatics and with electric currents, describe the motion of charged particles in magnetic fields and induction, explain the origin of electromagnetic waves and properties of light, determine the behavior of light waves passing through single or multiple slits, and understand elementary principles of quantum physics.

    PHYS 2212L: Principles of Physics Laboratory II
    This is an introductory laboratory for the calculus-based course on electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. The student will be able to apply the concepts of electric field and electric currents to problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements on magnetic fields and induction, optics, and elementary quantum physics phenomena. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed, along with graphical techniques and least-squares fits.

Professional Education Requirements (33 Credit Hours)

Candidates must be admitted to the B.S. in Education in Secondary Education program before taking these courses.

  • This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families, school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students and the characteristics of exceptionalities. This course, along with INED 3306, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement.

    Notes: Acceptance into Yearlong Clinical Experience required.

  • This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practices in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. This course requires an observational experience in an assigned school placement. Verification of professional liability insurance is required prior to placement in the field experience. This course, along with INED 3305, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement.

  • In this course, middle and/or secondary preservice content teachers are introduced to today’s student immigrant population, education policies that impact urban youth, first and second language acquisition, linguistic elements, and linguistically responsive pedagogy. In addition, candidates will begin to develop an understanding of these concepts as they relate to meeting the academic needs of English learners and recognizing the cultural resources that they bring to the content classroom in relation to the larger sociopolitical context.

  • This course focuses on developing effective instruction, assessment, and literacy development for English learners and other linguistically diverse learners in middle GRADE classrooms. Specifically, candidates will a) examine the academic, linguistic and social needs of linguistically diverse learners, b) explore the differences between teaching reading and writing to English learners and native English speakers; and c) develop skills necessary for the differentiation, scaffolding language and content for English learners at a variety of language proficiency levels.

  • Teacher candidates learn to use technologies to promote student achievement in high school content area and technology literacy standards. Special topics include using technology to improve students’ English language learning, to assess student learning, and to differentiate instruction. Candidates also learn to manage their digital activities in ways appropriate for a professional educator; advocate for students without beyond-school access; and teach K-12 students how to use technology safely, ethically, and legally. Forty-five field experience hours are required.

  • This course prepares teacher candidates to create and manage positive, productive classroom environments, including those with a diverse population of learners. Candidates will develop a comprehensive understanding of the learning and behavior principles that underlie effective classroom management and acquire strategies and skills needed to implement an effective management program. This course includes a 15-hour field experience.

    Notes: A current criminal history background check and proof of liability insurance is required.

  • Under the guidance of a collaborating teaching and a university instructor, the teacher candidate will complete a field experience in a designated school. This experience requires working in a co-teaching environment with diverse learners and focuses on understanding and responding to learners’ mathematical or scientific reasoning.

    Notes: Proof of professional liability insurance and a pre-service teaching certificate is required.

  • Under the guidance of a collaborating teaching and a university instructor, the teacher candidate will complete a field experience in a designated school. This experience requires working in a co-teaching environment with diverse learners and focuses on supporting learners’ mathematical or scientific discourse. Proof of professional liability insurance and a pre-service teaching certificate is required.

  • This is the third of three courses in a professional sequence toward becoming a well-prepared beginning secondary mathematics or science teacher. Topics include enhanced assessment and feedback strategies, developing classroom culture, and refining notions of learning, teaching, and equity. Students will apply their learning in an accompanying field experience.

  • This course is the beginning to the co-teaching Yearlong Clinical Experience in education. Candidates will attend the entirety of pre-planning at their assigned school before the start of the academic year (the exact timing of which will depend on the placement school’s schedule). Additionally, candidates will also attend the first week of the academic year in order to familiarize themselves with the policies and routines of their placement school and Collaborating Teacher.

  • MAED 4414: Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics I
    This is the first of three courses in a professional sequence toward becoming a well-prepared beginning secondary mathematics teacher. Topics include introductory ideas about mathematics education, including current mathematics standards and policy documents, cognitive learning theories, and teaching frameworks. Students will explore how secondary students think about and learn mathematics, examine how to select and modify tasks, use appropriate manipulatives and technology, differentiate instruction, and apply their learning in an accompanying field experience.

    MAED 4416: Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics II
    This is the second of three courses in a professional sequence toward becoming a well-prepared beginning secondary mathematics teacher. Topics include social learning theories, equity issues, and specific teaching strategies. Students will explore how to support discourse in the secondary mathematics classroom, develop questioning techniques, examine how to plan for learning sequences, and apply their learning in an accompanying field experience.

    MAED 4650: Yearlong Clinical Experience I
    This course is the first semester of an intensive and extensive co-teaching yearlong clinical practice in mathematics education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor and working in a diverse environment that includes students with exceptionalities and English learners, candidates practice professional competencies that impact student achievement. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars. Proof of liability insurance is required as well as a background check.

    MAED 4660: Yearlong Clinical Experience II
    This course is the second semester of an intensive and extensive co-teaching yearlong clinical experience in mathematics education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor and working in a diverse environment that includes students with exceptionalities and English learners, candidates practice professional competencies that impact student achievement. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars and the completion of a content pedagogy assessment.

    Notes: Proof of liability insurance is required as well as a background check.

  • SCED 4414: Methods of Teaching Secondary Science I
    This course examines teachers, students, content, and interactions that lead students to develop conceptual understandings of science. Science teacher candidates design and implement instructional activities informed by understanding of science learning, then assess student learning. The co-requisite for this course is a 60 hour field experience as introduction to the adolescent learner, the equity imperative and science education reform.

    SCED 4416: Methods of Teaching Secondary Science II
    Teacher candidates will develop pedagogical content knowledge through the design and implementation of inquiry and project-based science lessons appropriate to secondary learners. Candidates will use available student data and research-based literature and theory to help guide their lesson planning. Candidates will critically reflect upon their teaching practice using videos, journals, and discussions. This course is restricted to participants in the secondary science education program.

    SCED 4650: Yearlong Clinical Experience I
    This course is the first semester of an intensive and extensive co-teaching yearlong clinical experience in science education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor and working in a diverse environment that includes students with exceptionalities and English learners, candidates practice professional competencies that impact student achievement.

    Notes: This course includes regularly scheduled professional seminars. Proof of liability insurance is required.

    SCED 4660: Yearlong Clinical Experience II
    This course is an intensive and extensive co-teaching clinical experience in science education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor and working in a diverse environment that includes students with exceptionalities and English learners, candidates practice professional competencies that impact student achievement.

Additional Information

Students must petition to graduate during the semester PRIOR to their graduation semester. See the KSU Registrar’s website for more information.

For more information on advisement in undergraduate education programs, please call Education Student Services at 470.578.6105 or email BCOE_advising@kennesaw.edu. You may also email bsedsmge@kennesaw.edu.

©