B.S. in Middle Grades Education Courses

COURSES YEARLONG CLINICAL EXPERIENCE FAQS OVERVIEW KSU CATALOG

Program of Study
Program Total: 128-129 Credit Hours

The program includes 128-129 total hours (depending on Teaching Field), including 40 hours of Professional Education courses. All students complete, at least, 60 total hours of General Education courses. The number of hours required for Lower Division Major Requirements vary depending on Teaching Field:

  • Language Arts Education - 15-18 credit hours
  • Mathematics Education - 16-19 credit hours
  • Science Education - 18 credit hours
  • Social Studies Education - 15-18 credit hours

NOTE: The Reading Education concentration is no longer admitting students. Students who completed EDRD 3320 prior to or during the fall semester of 2017 will be allowed to complete the concentration. Please contact the B.S. in Middle Grades Education Program Coordinator at mgesmge@kennesaw.edu for more information.

General Education Requirements (42 Credit Hours)

See Listing of General Education Requirements

Lower Division Major Requirements (Area F) (18 Credit Hours)

In addition to the courses listed below, students must complete, at least, three hours of study in one of their chosen teaching field areas and six hours of study in the other.

  • This course engages potential education candidates in observations and interactions in schools, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Candidates investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Candidates actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, candidates reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture. Includes the use of current technologies which are directly related to effective teaching and 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

    Notes: Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • This course introduces teachers to fundamental knowledge of culture essential for effective teaching in increasingly diverse classrooms. Designed as a foundation course for subsequent courses focused on the preparation of culturally responsive teachers, this course examines 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definition and implications of diversity. Includes 15 hours of observation and participation in an appropriate school setting-elementary/early childhood, middle grades, secondary or P-12 environments. Verification of professional liability insurance and a criminal background check are required prior to receiving a school placement.

  • This course explores key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. Includes 10 hours of observation and interaction with a learner in a naturalistic setting. Current use of technology will be integrated as communication and instructional tools. Verification of professional liability insurance is required.

Teaching Field Requirements

Students must complete, at least, 18 hours of coursework in a primary content area and, at least, 15 hours of coursework in a secondary content area chosen from the following four teaching field concentrations. Those majoring in science must take 18 hours of science courses due to labs.

Teaching Field Requirements: Mathematics Education (16-19 Credit Hours)

Candidates take all required courses (16 credit hours) if mathematics is Teaching Field B. Candidates take all required courses plus one approved math elective (19 credit hours) if mathematics is Teaching Field A.

Candidates should take MATH 1112 or MATH 1113 and STAT 1107 as part of their General Education requirements.

  • This course is the first in the calculus curriculum and introduces the central concepts of calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions of one variable, applications of these concepts and a brief introduction to the integral of a function.

  • Designed for the preservice teacher of mathematics for adolescents. Content strands to be explored include number and operation, algebra, and measurement. The process standards of communication, connections, problem solving, reasoning and proof, and representation will be emphasized. Appropriate use of manipulatives, calculators and software will be integrated in course materials.

  • Introduction to Mathematical Systems is a course specifically designed to introduce students to the study of mathematics from a mathematical systems approach. A mathematical system consisting of undefined terms, axioms and theorems will be studied. The major emphasis of this class will be on the development of skills in communicating and justifying mathematical ideas and conclusions. Mathematical systems studied will vary according to the instructor and may be chosen from sets, number systems and/or geometry.

  • Designed to prepare prospective 5-8 teachers and 6-12 teachers to become effective facilitators in teaching geometry, this course develops geometry as an axiomatic mathematical system and approaches it from synthetic, transformational, and algebraic perspectives (including higher dimensions). Various geometries are studied including finite, infinite, projective, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean.

  • Students’ understanding of the mathematics taught in middle school and the first few years of high school will be deepened and broadened through the study of key topics including algebra, linear functions, exponential functions, quadratic functions, number theory, discrete mathematics, and mathematical modeling. This course is designed so that students can revisit key ideas in school mathematics, bringing with them the skills and understandings of college course work in mathematics, deepening and broadening their understanding, and connecting more advanced ideas to the topics they will teach in middle school and high school.

  • NOTE: Candidates should only take this course if Mathematics is Teaching Field A.

    Students will investigate classical and modern mathematics through problem-solving and mathematics-specific technologies. Students will have opportunities to connect course content with the middle and secondary school curriculum.

Teaching Field Requirements: Science Education (18 Credit Hours)

Candidates take all required courses (18 credit hours). Science can be Teaching Field A only.

Candidates should take MATH 1112 or MATH 1113 and STAT 1107 as part of their General Education requirements.

  • Students will learn the history of astronomy up to the Copernican Revolution including Galileo, Kepler, and Newton. They will also explore the workings of modern telescopes and study an overview of the solar system and the search for extra-solar planets. In lab students will use planetarium simulation software to explore the concepts and methods of observational astronomy.

  • CHEM 1211: General Chemistry I
    This course is the first in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry for science majors. Course content includes electronic structure of atoms and molecules, bonding fundamentals, fundamentals of chemical reactions, and gas laws.

    CHEM 1211L: General Chemistry I Laboratory
    First laboratory course in general chemistry. Designed to introduce the student to the application of cognitive skills utilizing chemical knowledge in the laboratory.

  • This course is a survey of life science topics designed to support middle grades education candidates in achieving the NSTA Middle Grades Content Standards for Life Science. Inquiry laboratory experiences are included in the course. This course is not appropriate for majors other than middle grades education with a science concentration.

  • PHYS 1111: Introductory Physics I
    This is an introductory algebra and trigonometry-based course on classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in kinematics and dynamics, use the law of universal gravitation to falling objects and orbital motion, describe simple harmonic motion, oscillations, and waves, and explain temperature, heat, and entropy.

    PHYS 1111L: Introductory Physics Laboratory I
    PHYS 1111L is an introductory laboratory for the trigonometry-based course on classical mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves. The student will be able to apply Newton’s laws and conservation of energy and momentum to various problems in the laboratory, and perform measurements of simple harmonic motion, oscillations, waves, temperature, and basic fluid dynamics. The analysis of sources of error and formal propagation of uncertainties will also be developed.

  • An introduction to basic earth science concepts and methodology (including geology, meteorology, and oceanography) will be covered. Special emphasis will be placed on dynamic Earth processes (plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanism, climate, etc.) and their effects on the structure and composition of the landforms, oceans, atmosphere, and organisms. The lab component includes hands-on evaluation of a collection of Igneous, Metamorphic and Sedimentary rocks, topographic map analyses, spectral imaging and remote sensing, and modeling weather related phenomena.

Teaching Field Requirements: Social Studies Education (15-18 Credit Hours)

Candidates take all required courses plus two approved social studies electives (15 credit hours) if social studies is Teaching Field B. Candidates take all required courses plus three approved social studies electives (18 credit hours) if social studies is Teaching Field A.

  • An introduction to world regions through the context of human geography. The course focuses on basic geographic concepts to analyze social, economic and political issues at local, regional and global scales. Elements of fundamental physical geography will be discussed to illustrate the spatial relationships between the physical environment and human geography.

  • This course explores major themes in the social, cultural, political, and economic history of the peoples of North America to 1877. Topics include the intersections of cultures in colonial America, the origin and development of the American republic, the evolution of democratic ideas and institutions, western expansion, slavery, sectional conflict, and emancipation and its aftermath.

  • A consideration of Georgia’s political, economic, social, and cultural development from the colonial period to the present. Topics include the cultures of indigenous peoples, the Spanish in Georgia, the founding of a British colony, the Revolution, Indian removal, antebellum society, the Civil War, Reconstruction, the New South era, the rise and decline of the cotton economy, race relations, and post-World War II prosperity and problems.

Teaching Field Requirements: Language Arts (15-18 Credit Hours)

Candidates take all required courses (15 credit hours) if language arts is Teaching Field B. Candidates take all required courses plus one approved language arts elective (18 credit hours) if language arts is Teaching Field A.

  • This course provides an introduction to teaching English Language Arts (grades 6-12). Through the study of theory and practice, context-based models, and specific applications, students explore the potential of the English Language Arts classroom and investigate the professional roles, relationships, and responsibilities of the English Language Arts teacher. This course is a prerequisite for all other English Education courses and mandatory for admittance to the English Education program.

  • This course is an exploration of current theories of composition pedagogy in practice at the middle grades level, including a variety of strategies for teaching and assessing writing while dealing with institutional policies (including state standards and high-stakes testing). Students write for a variety of purposes and audiences; analyze traditional and non-traditional writing assignments for their strengths and limitations; and develop effective instructional strategies, materials, and assessments.

  • This course examines approaches for teaching grammar in the middle grades. Students practice grammatical appropriateness in oral and written communication; develop an understanding of grammatical concepts and constructions; analyze errors in order to develop effective instruction; study structures as a means of promoting syntactic growth and diversity of style in writing; and develop constructive, use-based lessons. This course includes an overview of modern grammars, the history of grammar instruction, and research on grammar instruction.

  • This course is a survey of classic literature written by diverse authors. It focuses on text analysis and writing about literature. The texts studied are frequently found in the middle grades classroom.

  • Because language study is a key component of the English/Language Arts classroom, this course focuses on specific linguistic aspects of the English language (e.g., morphology, stylistics, discourse, etc.), grammar in context, language variation in life and literature, and sociolinguistic implications of teaching English. There is a strong focus on methodology, such as examining pedagogical stances and creating lesson plans.

Professional Education Requirements (40 Credit Hours)

Candidates must be admitted to the B.S. in Middle Grades Education program before taking these courses. Blocks I-IV must be completed in order, and courses within Blocks are to be taken concurrently.

Block I

  • Candidates examine the development and diversity of middle grades learners, as well as the concept and philosophy of the middle school. Issues of teaching young adolescents and the unique role teachers must play as interdisciplinary team members, content specialists, advocates for the middle school and middle level learner are explored. Information from current research and exemplary practices will be used to extend candidate knowledge.

  • This course prepares candidates to teach diverse works for adolescents from a variety of sources including young adult literature as well as technical, informational, environmental text, and the media. Text selection and electronic database media resources are introduced. A focus on language and cultural diversity is included. Candidates spend at least 15 hours in a middle grades classroom, arranged by the instructor. A current criminal history background check and proof of liability insurance is required.

Block II

  • This course is designed to introduce future middle grades teachers to the knowledge and skills necessary for effective planning, instruction, and assessment of a diverse population of middle grades learners. This course includes a 15-hour field experience placement in elementary grades 4-5. A current criminal history background check and proof of liability insurance is required.

  • This course prepares teacher candidates to create and manage positive, productive classroom environments, including those with a diverse population of learners. Candidates will develop a comprehensive understanding of the learning and behavior principles that underlie effective classroom management and acquire strategies and skills needed to implement an effective management program. This course includes a 15-hour field experience.

  • Teacher candidates learn to use technologies to promote student achievement in middle school content area and technology literacy standards. Special topics include using technology to improve students’ English language learning, to assess student learning, and to differentiate instruction. Candidates also learn to manage their digital activities in ways appropriate for a professional educator; advocate for students without beyond-school access; and teach K-12 students how to use technology safely, ethically, and legally. Twenty field experience hours are required.

Block III

  • This course is the beginning to the co-teaching Yearlong Clinical Experience in education. Candidates will attend the entirety of pre-planning at their assigned school before the start of the academic year (the exact timing of which will depend on the placement school’s schedule). Additionally, candidates will also attend the first week of the academic year in order to familiarize themselves with the policies and routines of their placement school and Collaborating Teacher.

  • This course is the first semester of an intensive and extensive co-teaching yearlong clinical practice in middle grades education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor, candidates practice professional competencies that impact achievement for diverse populations of learners including students with exceptionalities and English learners. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars. Proof of liability insurance is required.

  • This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families, school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students and the characteristics of exceptionalities. This course, along with INED 3306, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement.

    Notes: Acceptance into Yearlong Clinical Experience required.

  • In this course, middle and/or secondary preservice content teachers are introduced to today’s student immigrant population, education policies that impact urban youth, first and second language acquisition, linguistic elements, and linguistically responsive pedagogy. In addition, candidates will begin to develop an understanding of these concepts as they relate to meeting the academic needs of English learners and recognizing the cultural resources that they bring to the content classroom in relation to the larger sociopolitical context.

  • These courses are part of a 12-hour block designed to develop appropriate teaching strategies in candidates’ two teaching fields. Candidates apply learning theories, teaching techniques, questioning strategies, instructional materials, and assessment procedures for teaching science to middle grades learners. Candidates will develop and implement plans for teaching in an interdisciplinary team setting.

    EDMG 4401: Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades
    EDMG 4402: Teaching Science in Middle Grades
    EDMG 4403: Teaching Social Studies in Middle Grades
    EDMG 4404: Teaching Language Arts in Middle Grades
    EDMG 4408: Teaching Reading in the Middle Grades

Block IV

  • This seminar supports and assesses candidate development in middle grades education during the capstone experience. Candidate reflect on the development of their competencies, skills, and dispositions, and support for teacher performance assessments is provided. Seminar discussions will challenge candidates to examine and integrate current issues, values, and practices in the middle grades.

  • This course is the second semester of an intensive and extensive coteaching yearlong clinical experience in middle grades education. Under the guidance of a collaborating teacher and university supervisor and working in a diverse environment that includes students with exceptionalities and English learners, candidates practice professional competencies that impact student achievement. This experience includes regularly scheduled professional seminars and the completion of a content pedagogy assessment. Proof of liability insurance is required.

  • This course prepares candidates to work collaboratively with families and school personnel to have a positive impact on the educational, social and behavioral development of all students, including those with a full range of exceptionalities, in a diverse society. It focuses on knowledge of legislative mandates for serving exceptional students, characteristics of exceptionality, best practices in facilitating teaching and learning, and accountability through assessment of outcomes. This course requires an observational experience in an assigned school placement. Verification of professional liability insurance is required prior to placement in the field experience. This course, along with INED 3305, fulfills Georgia HB 671 requirement.

  • This course focuses on developing effective instruction, assessment, and literacy development for English learners and other linguistically diverse learners in middle GRADE classrooms. Specifically, candidates will a) examine the academic, linguistic and social needs of linguistically diverse learners, b) explore the differences between teaching reading and writing to English learners and native English speakers; and c) develop skills necessary for the differentiation, scaffolding language and content for English learners at a variety of language proficiency levels.

Additional Information

Students must petition to graduate during the semester PRIOR to their graduation semester. See the KSU Registrar’s website for more information.

For more information on advisement in undergraduate education programs, please call Education Student Services at 470.578.6105 or email BCOE_advising@kennesaw.edu. You may also email mgesmge@kennesaw.edu.

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